Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
TigerChamp

The Science Thread

Recommended Posts

qgMrjDT.jpg

This actually has nothing to do with Einstein. 

 

The Greeks calculated the circumference  of the Earth to within about 1000 miles by observing and measure the shadows the sun cast in the shaft of a water well using this theorem among others.  They were only out because the Earth is not a circle, although it approximates one. This all happened 1000 years before the Europeans "discovered" the earth was roundish. 

 

Science is awesome.

 

One of God's best Creations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So a Google VP named Alan Eustace decided to go out and break the skydiving record set two years ago by Felix Baumgartner and Red Bull, with little to no media coverage, cause he could.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2014/oct/25/google-executive-alan-eustace-beats-felix-baumgartners-skydiving-record

 

Dude fell from 41 150 Metres 130 000 thousand feet and hit mach 1.23 (1322 Kmh 822 mph).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141023142306.htm

 

Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.

 

After contact with the invasive species, the native lizards began perching higher in trees, and, generation after generation, their feet evolved to become better at gripping the thinner, smoother branches found higher up.

The change occurred at an astonishing pace: Within a few months, native lizards had begun shifting to higher perches, and over the course of 15 years and 20 generations, their toe pads had become larger, with more sticky scales on their feet.

"We did predict that we'd see a change, but the degree and quickness with which they evolved was surprising," said Yoel Stuart, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Integrative Biology at The University of Texas at Austin and lead author of the study appearing in the Oct. 24 edition of the journal Science.

"To put this shift in perspective, if human height were evolving as fast as these lizards' toes, the height of an average American man would increase from about 5 foot 9 inches today to about 6 foot 4 inches within 20 generations -- an increase that would make the average U.S. male the height of an NBA shooting guard," said Stuart. "Although humans live longer than lizards, this rate of change would still be rapid in evolutionary terms."

The native lizards studied, known as Carolina anoles or green anoles, are common in the southeastern U.S. The invasive species, Cuban anoles or brown anoles, are native to Cuba and the Bahamas. Brown anoles first appeared in South Florida in the 1950s, possibly as stowaways in agricultural shipments from Cuba, and have since spread across the southeastern U.S. and have even jumped to Hawaii.

This latest study is one of only a few well-documented examples of what evolutionary biologists call "character displacement," in which similar species competing with each other evolve differences to take advantage of different ecological niches. A classic example comes from the finches studied by Charles Darwin. Two species of finch in the Galápagos Islands diverged in beak shape as they adapted to different food sources.

The researchers speculate that the competition between brown and green anoles for the same food and space may be driving the adaptations of the green anoles. Stuart also noted that the adults of both species are known to eat the hatchlings of the other species.

"So it may be that if you're a hatchling, you need to move up into the trees quickly or you'll get eaten," said Stuart. "Maybe if you have bigger toe pads, you'll do that better than if you don't."

Stuart's co-authors are Todd Campbell at the University of Tampa; Paul Hohenlohe of the University of Idaho; Robert Reynolds of the University of Massachusetts, Boston; Liam Revell at the University of Massachusetts, Boston; and Jonathan Losos at Harvard University.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reading zoom at the moment. Great book. Today i learnt that 3 trillion neutrinos pass through the human body every second.

Thought it was so interesting i logged on whist on holiday specially to share it with you.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reading zoom at the moment. Great book. Today i learnt that 3 trillion neutrinos pass through the human body every second.

Thought it was so interesting i logged on whist on holiday specially to share it with you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Numbers-wise, microbes including bacteria, viruses, and fungi outnumber human cells by about ten to one. The vast majority of these microbes are harmless or even beneficial, with just a small handful known to cause problems. One algae virus that was previously believed to be harmless in humans has been discovered to cause a modest reduction in brain power. Robert Yolken of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Stanley Division of Developmental Neurovirology served as lead author of the paper, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.


Previous research by the team for an unrelated study found that the virus, Acanthocystis turfacea Chlorella virus 1 (ATCV-1), that typically infects freshwater green algae can be found in the throats of otherwise healthy humans. While some viruses mutate and caninfect different species, such as avian flu evolving and infecting humans, this is a very rare example of a virus that is able to infect a completely different kingdom. 


ATCV-1 was found in 40 of the 92 participants from that initial trial. Further study revealed that those who were infected by the virus scored 7 to 9 points lower on attention and visual processing tests, respectively, than those who were not infected. While this is not a massive difference, it is statistically significant.


“This is a striking example showing that the ‘innocuous’ microorganisms we carry can affect behavior and cognition,” Yolken said in a press release. “Many physiological differences between person A and person B are encoded in the set of genes each inherits from parents, yet some of these differences are fueled by the various microorganisms we harbor and the way they interact with our genes.”


The team went on to infect a group of healthy mice with the virus, which seemed to dramatically affect attention span and cognition. The infected group took more time solving mazes than their uninfected counterparts, and they did not pay as much attention to new pathways presented or new objects placed within the environment that should have been of interest. 


Brain scans confirmed that ATCV-1 was the culprit behind the sapped attention by causing changes in expression to nearly 1300 genes in the hippocampus, the area responsible for storing memories and helping bodies be properly oriented in the environment. The virus altered how the hippocampus responds to the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is widely used throughout the brain and integral to the immune system. Though the virus has not been discovered to infect the brain directly, it could act on the connection with the immune system.


Though mice are not on par cognitively with humans, the fact that both groups showed attention deficit was of interest to the researchers. The team also isn’t sure exactly how the virus is producing these cognitive changes or how it initially came to infect humans. Further studies are required.


“The similarity of our findings in mice and humans underscores the common mechanisms that many microbes use to affect cognitive function in both animals and people,” added co-author Mikhail Pletnikov. “This commonality is precisely what allows us to study the pathologies that these microorganisms fuel and do so in a controlled systematic way.”


 


http://www.iflscience.com/brain/algae-virus-humans-found-drain-brain-power


  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomorrow is the day when they try to land a spacecraft on a comet. Is anybody else excited?

I wouldnt say excited, but definitely curious to see if they can actually pull it off. a lot to be learned from this .

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomorrow is the day when they try to land a spacecraft on a comet. Is anybody else excited?

I didn't even know this was going to happen.  Hopefully this gets a lot more coverage on the news.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This is how White Blood Cells keep you safe

(in the video, a white blood cell chases and engulfs this bacteria–watch until the end!)

 

 

white-blood-cell-attacks-bacteria-consum

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was told by the TS that this post belongs here, enjoy!
 

800 pages, a new milestone reached. Time to celebrate with Newtons first law, breasts in motion tend to stay in motion.

 

bounce_by_ecchi_senshi-d65c3go.gif

girl-boobs-bouncing-gif-1119303.gif

stairs.gif

 
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is how White Blood Cells keep you safe

(in the video, a white blood cell chases and engulfs this bacteria–watch until the end!)

 
 
white-blood-cell-attacks-bacteria-consum

 

Red blood cells suck....they just stood around doing nothing while white busted his ****!!

War white blood cells!

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what Andromeda would look like in our night sky if it were brighter. Supposedly this is a scale image.

 

EpuhHJa.png

Pretty badass right there.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty badass right there.

The thing that makes my head almost pop thinking about it is, think about how ****ing far away that is, and the hugeness of it for us to be able to see it at that size. It's an almost unimaginably gigantic, yet invisible... thing.

 

Apparently our current night sky blows thanks to technology, and people just a few hundred years ago and less could see the Milky Way with the naked eye. I think there are some remote places where this is still slightly possible.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×