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Man freed from jail 32 years after wrongful murder conviction


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#1 Jolldan

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 08:03 AM

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A man who served 32 years in prison for a crime he says he did not commit has told Sky News he never gave up believing he would be released.

 

Andrew Wilson, 62, walked free from a jail in Los Angeles after a judge threw out his murder conviction and vacated his sentence.

 

He is likely to be formally cleared of the charge within a few weeks.

 

He was greeted by family members, some of whom he had never met, when he was released from LA's Men's Central jail.

 

A few hours later, he described the emotions of that moment.

 

"It scared me," he said. "But it was a good moment, it was a happy moment for me because I got a chance, not to just sit and talk to them, but I had the chance to hug my loved ones and tell them that I love them."

 

Mr Wilson was convicted of robbing and killing 21-year-old Christopher Hanson as he slept in a parked car with his girlfriend in south-central Los Angeles in October 1984.

 

He has always maintained he was not guilty and student campaigners from the Project for the Innocent at the city's Loyola Law School took up his case in 2015.

 

Prosecutors admitted that a series of errors had prevented Mr Wilson from receiving a fair trial. They

are not expected to take any further action against him.

 

The court heard that key evidence had been withheld from the jury during the original trial including that which showed Mr Hanson's girlfriend was not a credible witness.

 

Mr Wilson says he "doesn't have time" to be angry at those who put him in jail. "If I do that, I'm taking good energy and wasting it when I can be spending that energy on my family.

 

"I don't have time to waste being mad or thinking of something negative. Life is too short."

 

He said the fight to prove his innocence kept him going while he was inside.

 

"You just do it," he said. "You keep your fight going. It's like anything else, if there is something that you want you have to fight for it and you never give up.

"If you know you're innocent, you never give up.

"I'm glad I didn't give up."

 

Mr Wilson said being outside had come as a shock. "It is all so space-age now. I haven't had movement like this, seen movement like this, just 32 years of being confined."

 

He paid tribute to the law students who campaigned for him, saying he would give his life for them.

 

A court will decide in May whether Mr Wilson should now be ruled innocent of the crime. That would open the way for him to receive compensation from the state of California.

 

His mother spent years trying to get attention for his case. He will now be with her when she turns 97 in a few weeks' time.

 

Amazing.


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#2 SVTContour98

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 08:11 AM

this is one reason not to ever use the death penalty...there's too much room for unethical behavior.


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3 Facts Everyone Must Face:

#1 If there is no God, then your life has no objective meaning.

#2 You didn't bring yourself into this World, and you cannot ultimately prevent your Death.

#3 Jesus Existed.



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#3 Lady_boy

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 08:54 AM

this is one reason not to ever use the death penalty...there's too much room for unethical behavior.

 

I posted exactly the same thing on the Sky News article on this story on Facebook.  You cannot un-crack an egg.


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#4 MoZZez

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 06:44 AM

We had a guy up here cleared in the late 90s. 21 years I think he had served so far. Never once wavered from his innocence.

Once he was out, people were thinking he should pay the government for all the years he room and boarded with them. I would like to think they were trolls, but these were at the time mid 40 to 60 year old people who literally though a man unjustly sentenced to prison for 21 years owes the government for what he ate and used in power.



As for the death penalty. In this day and age with cameras and DNA and morons posting about it on Facebook. What are the chances of someone being on death row for something they didn't commit. This isn't the days of eyewitness being the be all end all.

They should do it like in Iraq. Guilty. One appeal within a few days. Out to the stocks.
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#5 TheSinisterUrge

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 07:43 AM

We had a guy up here cleared in the late 90s. 21 years I think he had served so far. Never once wavered from his innocence.

Once he was out, people were thinking he should pay the government for all the years he room and boarded with them. I would like to think they were trolls, but these were at the time mid 40 to 60 year old people who literally though a man unjustly sentenced to prison for 21 years owes the government for what he ate and used in power.



As for the death penalty. In this day and age with cameras and DNA and morons posting about it on Facebook. What are the chances of someone being on death row for something they didn't commit. This isn't the days of eyewitness being the be all end all.

They should do it like in Iraq. Guilty. One appeal within a few days. Out to the stocks.


The gubmint should pay them for what they lost in potential earnings while they were in prison.

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#6 I_Take_Roids_m8

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 07:50 AM

The dude will walk away with millions. He lost part of his life, probably the best years but he will be set for the rest of his life.
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#7 UFCCagerattler

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 08:49 AM

The DP is a farce. It costs more to execute someone in the USA than to lock them up for life. Counties have gone broke prosecuting DP cases and probably the biggest determinant in whether someone gets the DP or a life sentence is the county they are tried in and the money that county has.



#8 I_Take_Roids_m8

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 09:15 AM

The DP is a farce. It costs more to execute someone in the USA than to lock them up for life. Counties have gone broke prosecuting DP cases and probably the biggest determinant in whether someone gets the DP or a life sentence is the county they are tried in and the money that county has.



Thats why literally 5 minutes after they are sentenced to death, they should be executed in the streets.

The 17 yeara or however long they have until they can be put down is costing tax payers money between housing and appeals.

Simple solution with todays DNA analysis, fingerprinting, and whatnot.
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#9 StompGrind

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 12:10 PM

this is one reason not to ever use the death penalty...there's too much room for unethical behavior.

This is one of the main reasons i'm not for the death penalty. 

 

Say you're a juror. 

 

1. Reasonable doubt. Define that? To me if there is even a minuscule chance someone isn't guilty i couldn't condemn them. Jury would h8 me because you'd have to have mountains of certain evidence not a mountain of circumstantial evidence that is flimsy AF under any scrutiny. 

 

2. Not a fan at all of slick talking lawyers trying to toy with people's emotions, selecting jurors that are easily played like a fiddle nor the court system in general which is mainly a money machine without a pulse. 

 

3. Eye witness testimony is utterly unreliable. Even DNA, fingerprints, however unlikely they can be planted. While it may be extremely rare people can and do get framed and or coerced into confessions by police via unethical interrogation tactics. 

 

All that being said if it's a heinous pre-meditated crime that warrants the death penalty and the defendant is adamant they did it or the evidence is just so completely utterly overwhelming then off with their head. 


Edited by StompGrind, 18 March 2017 - 12:11 PM.

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#10 TheSinisterUrge

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 02:30 AM

This is one of the main reasons i'm not for the death penalty.

Say you're a juror.

1. Reasonable doubt. Define that? To me if there is even a minuscule chance someone isn't guilty i couldn't condemn them. Jury would h8 me because you'd have to have mountains of certain evidence not a mountain of circumstantial evidence that is flimsy AF under any scrutiny.

2. Not a fan at all of slick talking lawyers trying to toy with people's emotions, selecting jurors that are easily played like a fiddle nor the court system in general which is mainly a money machine without a pulse.

3. Eye witness testimony is utterly unreliable. Even DNA, fingerprints, however unlikely they can be planted. While it may be extremely rare people can and do get framed and or coerced into confessions by police via unethical interrogation tactics.

All that being said if it's a heinous pre-meditated crime that warrants the death penalty and the defendant is adamant they did it or the evidence is just so completely utterly overwhelming then off with their head.


I say the death penalty should be reserved for guilty pleas for premeditated or cold blood murder cases. Ones where there won't be an appeals process that costs tax payers above and beyond the normal cost of incarceration.
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#11 UFCCagerattler

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 09:30 AM

The death penalty is not something that a justice system as terrible as ours has any business playing around with.