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I wish I had that $$$ to buy me some happiness!


Bar_Arm

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Speaking as someone who comes from a family of money, I will tell you right now, money does not buy happiness. If you think a car or the ability to go buy a few drinks is going to give you lasting happiness, you are unfortunately mistaken. Material processions may temporarily raise your endorphin levels, but after a short period of time it's no longer an exciting new toy, it's become just another utilitarian object with it's own set of financial needs. As for quitting your job, have you ever considered just how much satisfaction one receives from employment? A sense of accomplishment is needed, and many psychologists suggest one of the most vital aspects of a well adjusted and happy psyche is a job in which they can feel useful. Drinking and drugs are temporary and only serve as a distraction. As for relationships, you'll find quite quickly that you receive no emotional benefit being with someone that is with you for something as simple as status of money...it leaves you feeling empty, about as empty as that house which despite how much cool stuff you shovel into it, it may never become a home.

 

No my friends, I have seen countless instances and experienced first hand - lasting happiness has no correlation to monetary gains. At best, it can serve as a temporary mask that conceals the underlaying problems. I'm not saying money is bad, and it's incredibly handy to have in terms of opportunities available to you, but it does not bring happiness.

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Speaking as someone who comes from a family of money' date=' I will tell you right now, money does not buy happiness. If you think a car or the ability to go buy a few drinks is going to give you lasting happiness, you are unfortunately mistaken. Material processions may temporarily raise your endorphin levels, but after a short period of time it's no longer an exciting new toy, it's become just another utilitarian object with it's own set of financial needs. As for quitting your job, have you ever considered just how much satisfaction one receives from employment? A sense of accomplishment is needed, and many psychologists suggest one of the most vital aspects of a well adjusted and happy psyche is a job in which they can feel useful. Drinking and drugs are temporary and only serve as a distraction. As for relationships, you'll find quite quickly that you receive no emotional benefit being with someone that is with you for something as simple as status of money...it leaves you feeling empty, about as empty as that house which despite how much cool stuff you shovel into it, it may never become a home.

 

No my friends, I have seen countless instances and experienced first hand - lasting happiness has no correlation to monetary gains. At best, it can serve as a temporary mask that conceals the underlaying problems. I'm not saying money is bad, and it's incredibly handy to have in terms of opportunities available to you, but it does not bring happiness.[/quote']try selling that statment to someone who just about gets about i can asure you there response would not be oh yes i agree.

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Money can't buy all forms of happiness' date=' but that doesn't mean that it can't gain you any happiness. Here's one example that would probably make most people happy. Being financially secured for the rest of your life. Never having to worry about money problems would lift a great burden of stress on so many people.[/quote']

 

try selling that statment to someone who just about gets about i can asure you there response would not be oh yes i agree.

 

There is a difference between alleviating a specific stress (see: household bills) and bringing happiness. Having money means one doesn't carry around that specific burden and isn't agonizing over their finances to the same degree, but that does not in it of itself bring forth happiness. Money is a solution to an economical problem, but it is not the provider of emotional joy.

 

Money can not buy happiness. Money can buy material objects and allow for pleasurable experiences, but it does not give off good feelings. Believe me, the happiest people I've known have a decent income and live an honest life within their financial means. I've personally observed that extremes on either end of the wealth spectrum seem to be brought nothing but anguish of their financial state. I tend to think of happiness/wealth more as a bell curve than a horizontal line.

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There is a difference between alleviating a specific stress (see: household bills) and bringing happiness. Having money means one doesn't carry around that specific burden and isn't agonizing over their finances to the same degree' date=' but that does not in it of itself bring forth happiness. Money is a solution to an economical problem, but it is not the provider of emotional joy.

 

Money can not buy happiness. Money can buy material objects and allow for pleasurable experiences, but it does not give off good feelings. Believe me, the happiest people I've known have a decent income and live an honest life within their financial means. I've personally observed that extremes on either end of the wealth spectrum seem to be brought nothing but anguish of their financial state. I tend to think of happiness/wealth more as a bell curve than a horizontal line.[/quote']

 

So you're telling me that alleviating stress can't bring forth happiness? You're telling me that a child, a child who's been starved to death his whole life, doesn't gain happiness out of eating real food for the very first time? Food that was bought with... guess what? Money.

 

You can argue that you can't buy real love with money, but that's not at all what I'm saying. I'm merely stating that money can bring happiness, just not every type of happiness. And surely it need not be permanent, but alas, most things are not. Tick tock tick tock tick tock ...

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See, it's the age old adage of people with money do not know the value of it. You don't know what you got til its gone. If something is in ready supply then it loses it's importance. For someone who has very little or none it is the most important thing in the world. So of course money can make you happy cause if you have none you lead such a hard life. If you have loads then you never have to want for anything and don't appreciate anything as everything is disposable and that transfers over to other parts of your life.

 

Ever noticed why the majority of people with money are arrogant and self richeous? That's because they know they don't have to be nice to people because they don't need anything off anyone.

 

And my view? Yes money can also buy you love.

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See' date=' [b']it's the age old adage of people with money do not know the value of it. You don't know what you got til its gone.[/b] If something is in ready supply then it loses it's importance. For someone who has very little or none it is the most important thing in the world. So of course money can make you happy cause if you have none you lead such a hard life. If you have loads then you never have to want for anything and don't appreciate anything as everything is disposable and that transfers over to other parts of your life.

 

Ever noticed why the majority of people with money are arrogant and self richeous? That's because they know they don't have to be nice to people because they don't need anything off anyone.

 

And my view? Yes money can also buy you love.

 

Than I should probably have some perspective on this issue - as I said earlier I was raised in a family that was quite wealthy, but when I chose to move to California to pursue a career in acting I went out on my own. I survived in Los Angeles earning less than $14k a year. And when rent costs about $700 a month, car insurance in another Benjamin, and a phone bill throws you a hefty $60 deficit every month, that basically left me with just about $150 left to cover food, gas and utilities and basically didn't leave me a single cent for clothes or recreational purposes. I didn't live a life of luxury - and the truth is I damn sure missed it. But as a person, I was happier doing that than I ever had been being raised in a house filled with cash but short on joy.

 

I would hope I don't come across as arrogant of self-righteous, but I can't help but feel like that comment might have been indirectly aimed at me. Regardless, I find it odd that you believe a personality trait can be broadly used to describe a large portion of people simply based off their economical positions. It seems like you have some kind of resentment towards the more wealthy, as though almost anyone who became or came from money must be tainted in some way...

 

As for love - I simply am not the right person to talk about love. In my heart, I don't believe that's true on a mass level, I'm sure there are people who love money so much it has a transference effect on those who have money, but generally, I don't believe that. However, like I said, I am not expert in the subject, so I'll leave that for philosophers and love gurus to decide.

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Than I should probably have some perspective on this issue - as I said earlier I was raised in a family that was quite wealthy' date=' but when I chose to move to California to pursue a career in acting I went out on my own. I survived in Los Angeles earning less than $14k a year. And when rent costs about $700 a month, car insurance in another Benjamin, and a phone bill throws you a hefty $60 deficit every month, that basically left me with just about $150 left to cover food, gas and utilities and basically didn't leave me a single cent for clothes or recreational purposes. I didn't live a life of luxury - and the truth is I damn sure missed it. But as a person, I was happier doing that than I ever had been being raised in a house filled with cash but short on joy.

 

I would hope I don't come across as arrogant of self-righteous, but I can't help but feel like that comment might have been indirectly aimed at me. [b']Regardless, I find it odd that you believe a personality trait can be broadly used to describe a large portion of people simply based off their economical positions. It seems like you have some kind of resentment towards the more wealthy,[/b] as though almost anyone who became or came from money must be tainted in some way...

 

As for love - I simply am not the right person to talk about love. In my heart, I don't believe that's true on a mass level, I'm sure there are people who love money so much it has a transference effect on those who have money, but generally, I don't believe that. However, like I said, I am not expert in the subject, so I'll leave that for philosophers and love gurus to decide.

 

 

See thats what I am talking about,. People with money assume people with less than them resent them and vice versa. But as it happens I do resent the fact that I dont have a lot of money while others do, because I will bet that i work harder than a hell of a lot of people that have things handed to them.

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See thats what I am talking about' date='. [b']People with money assume people with less than them resent them and vice versa.[/b] But as it happens I do resent the fact that I dont have a lot of money while others do, because I will bet that i work harder than a hell of a lot of people that have things handed to them.

 

Actually I don't think that about "people with less than them" I directed it specifically at you. And you went ahead and admitted your resentment. And for what it's worth, I no longer have any money. I'm in debt, I have bills every month, and they seem to be pilling up faster than my income is coming in. But I don't think that if I had a windfall it would make me happier than I am right now. It would make paying the bills easier, but that wouldn't bring me happiness from nothing.

 

And may I just point out, that for someone who dislikes the "self righteous" attitude you claim is possessed by most of the upper class, you have your own sense of smug superiority rooted in the assumption that you work harder than they do and are therefore entitled to more. As though you could ever truly measure the degrees of how hard someone works.

 

Honestly my friend, I think you may find life easier if you don't worry about what others do or don't have. If you go to sleep at night in the comfort of your own bed, have food to eat, and care and are cared for by friends and/or family - than what more could you want? Life isn't a competition of material gains, and you're not playing against anyone. Someone once said "Happiness isn't getting what you want. It's wanting what you have."

 

I know you have a daughter on the way, trust me, she's more precious than all the money in the world combined. :)

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And my view? Yes money can also buy you love.

 

Real love? I'd say no. If anything, the person that is in "love" would more than likely be in love with your money, not you. The lifestyle that comes with having lots of money, and again, not you. So no, I don't think it can buy you love. At least not real love.

 

Suppose you could say that it could give you the illusion of real love, but never the real deal.

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to all the rich people saying money cant buy happiness ur all idiots. do u know what makes us normal people happy? security, security comes from money. u dont have to worry about anything. also i dont get depressed, if i lived in a one room apartment i would still be happy with my money, i just wouldnt spend time in the room i would sleep there then go out somewhere.... or just play videogames those make me happy

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