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Can you slide tackle an opponent


guti

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Im just curious why is it that noone ever slide tackles an opponent? ... I mean it would be pretty damn hard to defend a slide tackle and if done properly they could even injured your opponent . Someone like jones for example would be pretty easy to slide tackle and with those skinny legs i m sure if would hurt a lot .

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Great question' date=' I'm curious for an answer too. Ankles would be getting broken left and right haha![/quote']

 

 

ankles and knees.

 

In a way it is like a superman punch with your feet , if aim to the right direction it could easily break your knees or ankles. Of course it would have to be set up right , like at the beggning of a round where there is enough distance.

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ankles and knees.

 

In a way it is like a superman punch with your feet ' date=' if aim to the right direction it could easily break your knees or ankles. Of course it would have to be set up right , like at the beggning of a round where there is enough distance.[/quote']

 

To actually slide you would have to be wet or sweaty so I'm not sure if it would work at the beginning of a fight.

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The octagonfloor is canvas, meant to provide grip. Sliding is out of the question. But even if you could people would see it coming and siply sidestep.

 

Another technique which is also strangely absent from most fights is the stepping sidekick. You can easily hide that behind a straight punch and it's the most powerful kick a human being can deliver.

 

 

brutal...

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The octagonfloor is canvas' date=' meant to provide grip. Sliding is out of the question. But even if you could people would see it coming and siply sidestep.

 

Another technique which is also strangely absent from most fights is the stepping sidekick. You can easily hide that behind a straight punch and it's the most powerful kick a human being can deliver.

 

 

brutal...[/quote']

 

Hit the nail on the head. Slide tackles would not work at all.

 

I practice this kick all the time. Bruce Lee always used this kick, it was one of his favorites. I don't get why we don't see it in MMA really. Like you said you can set it up with a punch and it's pretty damn powerful. You can also cover a lot of distance with it.

 

It also works well after you throw a right head kick then a right sidekick also. Nam Phan did that to Leonard Garcia and it knocked him down. It might not be as powerful as if you stepped into it but it's harder to see coming and will land more often.

 

Just like this but without the decapitation.

 

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I like Kwonkicker a lot also. He has great technique.

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Hit the nail on the head. Slide tackles would not work at all.

 

I practice this kick all the time. Bruce Lee always used this kick' date=' it was one of his favorites. I don't get why we don't see it in MMA really. Like you said you can set it up with a punch and it's pretty damn powerful. You can also cover a lot of distance with it.

 

It also works well after you throw a right head kick then a right sidekick also. Nam Phan did that to Leonard Garcia and it knocked him down. It might not be as powerful as if you stepped into it but it's harder to see coming and will land more often.

 

Just like this but without the decapitation.

 

 

I like Kwonkicker a lot also. He has great technique.[/quote']

 

Here are a few reasons.

 

MMA fighters often have a much more squared up stance to attack and defend well with all things be it striking or grappling. Think of it as the most well rounded stance to attack or defend against most attacks. Yeah i know everyones stance in mma is uniquely thier own but alot of them fall somewhere in between the Thaiboxers more squared stance and the Karate/TKD guys more sideways stance. It's just better for all around balanced in between those extremes.

 

A more squared stance like many thai fighters use isn't so good for sidekicks and back side kicks as you'd have to get more sideways first to deliver them more effectively and that defeats the purpose as it telegraphs your intentions. A more squared stance also somewhat limits your punching range but it increases lead hand power but it leaves your centerline more open especially the body which is often difficult to get out of the way. It's also harder to cover distance in/out as quickly. A squared up stance is great for powerful roundhouse kicks and hooks and also easier to defend circular attacks but you have to set things up a little more because it limits distance some and telepgraphs attacks some. In general it's easier to to be visually aware of the direction squared shoulders and hips are moving and that's a decent way to read what attacks are coming.

 

With the squared stance your basically creating a wall of elbows and knees on the outside and you redirect and counter anything coming down the centerline.

 

A more side stance like in Karate or TKD allows you greater mobility in/out but not necessarily that much laterally. In most cases you need distance to throw side and back kicks effectively and it can also be a little more awkward for punching. It tends to makes your lead a little weaker and flicky but usually less telegraphic but it's usually harder to keep a tough pressure fighter off you with a weaker lead. They will take it and club you with a monstrous shot.

 

The distance with a side stance can sometimes be easier to read those direct attacks coming. Visually you can read the tells better from a distance and the time it takes to cover such distance allows more time for the opponent to react. If they anticipate they can prepare to time you and if you miss hitting the target just right or they deflect and redirect with your full momentum coming forward you will be off balance so bad that you'll pay for it with your head in the front row or get taken down or worse the opponent gets a dominant angle on your blindside and attack pretty much however they want. Your timing, distance and accuracy have to be absolutely flawless or there is great danger in over commiting your center.

 

It's definitely more powerful if you step in as long as when it lands they're on the end of it but it's very hard to time and land perfectly and it's easier to read.

 

Now with all that said if you're still reading it can be done but not alot of fighters are good enough with it and it comes with alot of risk unless you have tons of experience not only with that kick but dealing with mma fighters in a more sideways stance.

 

Cung Le is excellent at it and he usually does either from his stance ( when an opponent rushes directly. ) Or sometimes as he's stalking at the right moment he takes a sort of gliding step, he sort of glide steps his back leg up under his center of gravity and with the forward momentum snaps out the kick and recovers his stance.

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+ 100 for you StompGrind, droppin knowledge.

 

I agree with everything. You have to be really good at it to pull it off and not get countered or telegraph it. I just think it is an underutilized kick and could catch a lot of people off guard if done correctly.

 

I only really use it one way when I'm sparring and that's after I throw a right head kick. Cause I agree with you if you step into the sidekick or don't hide it well then they will see it coming for sure. I use it after I throw a right head kick because usually they are still close enough to land that side kick right after. And it's only one step right after you throw the head kick so it's kind of hard to see coming if you do it quick.

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