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Do you think sparring is a good indicator of how well a person fights?


RogerJones620

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My friend and I both train at the same gym, and he has been boxing and doing BJJ for about 10 years longer than I have. Every time we spar he absolutely destroys me, but recently since we were in the same weight class and our gym was having a tournament I ended up having to fight him for real.

 

I was really scared because I knew he could kill me, and I went into the first round thinking "I wonder how long I will last before I get knocked out." Anyways, I landed a cross on him and he immediately fell to the ground and I dove into his guard like an amateur. While he normally submits me really easily, I found that he couldn't do this when I was allowed to throw elbows in his face and punch his rib cage (something we don't simulate when grappling).

 

Eventually the fight got stopped in the first round, and I was declared the winner.

 

I'm now starting to wonder if sparring isn't necessarily the best indicator of how a real fight will go? Or if this was just a fluke?

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Not at all...

 

There tends to be two types of fighters, and I heard this from a fighter's mouth, so I'm not just spitting steam. There are gym heros and gameday players. A lot of people are gym heros, and look seriously sick in the gym, but can't put it together the same in a real fight, and others just train around in the gym, but go out to fight with much more cruel intent, do way better in the octagon.

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Of course, the only difference usually between sparring and a real fight is intensity and protective gear. When I did kickboxing we had pretty good sparring in a boxing ring, I think the difference between sparring and a real fight is you don't go in for the kill if you rock your opponent in sparring.

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Plus with all the injuries lately, I don't think anyone wants to really go all out during sparring risking injury. Instead....I think of sparring as a cardio/conditioning workout. Your only really tested when the real fight comes and thats when your true colors will show.

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Plus with all the injuries lately' date=' I don't think anyone wants to really go all out during sparring risking injury. Instead....I think of sparring as a cardio/conditioning workout. Your only really tested when the real fight comes and thats when your true colors will show.[/quote']

 

Yeah right, if you don't spar hard you'll get your *** kicked in a fight. Sounds like you've never even done real sparring. You put on head gear, gloves and shin pads and go all out, just stop if someone is wobbled.

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Not at all...

 

There tends to be two types of fighters' date=' and I heard this from a fighter's mouth, so I'm not just spitting steam. There are gym heros and gameday players. A lot of people are gym heros, and look seriously sick in the gym, but can't put it together the same in a real fight, and others just train around in the gym, but go out to fight with much more cruel intent, do way better in the octagon.[/quote']

 

Then you get reality where they tend to be good at both! :rolleyes:

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Yeah right' date=' if you don't spar hard you'll get your *** kicked in a fight. Sounds like you've never even done real sparring. You put on head gear, gloves and shin pads and go all out, just stop if someone is wobbled.[/quote']

 

haha, oh my god. I remember the first time I sparred and wearing that headgear. I seriously thought that because I had that helmet on that getting punched in the head wouldn't hurt at all. Dude, it hurt like hell even with that padding. But what was funny is, I didn't know how to put the helmet on correctly, so when this dude threw a hook at me my helmet spinned around and blocked my eyes completely, and then he began throwing a flurry of body shots and upper cuts and I couldn't see anything. Finally our coach stopped it and fixed my head gear.

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My friend and I both train at the same gym' date=' and he has been boxing and doing BJJ for about 10 years longer than I have. Every time we spar he absolutely destroys me, but recently since we were in the same weight class and our gym was having a tournament I ended up having to fight him for real.

 

I was really scared because I knew he could kill me, and I went into the first round thinking "I wonder how long I will last before I get knocked out." Anyways, I landed a cross on him and he immediately fell to the ground and I dove into his guard like an amateur. While he normally submits me really easily, I found that he couldn't do this when I was allowed to throw elbows in his face and punch his rib cage (something we don't simulate when grappling).

 

Eventually the fight got stopped in the first round, and I was declared the winner.

 

I'm now starting to wonder if sparring isn't necessarily the best indicator of how a real fight will go? Or if this was just a fluke? [/quote']

 

There's a tremendous difference. Some people I dominated sparring sometimes beat me easily in a real fight and vice-versa. If you're not fighting for reals, you just can't tell.

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haha' date=' oh my god. I remember the first time I sparred and wearing that headgear. I seriously thought that because I had that helmet on that getting punched in the head wouldn't hurt at all. Dude, it hurt like hell even with that padding. But what was funny is, I didn't know how to put the helmet on correctly, so when this dude threw a hook at me my helmet spinned around and blocked my eyes completely, and then he began throwing a flurry of body shots and upper cuts and I couldn't see anything. Finally our coach stopped it and fixed my head gear.[/quote']

 

In boxing, head gear is intended to stop cuts, mainly from accidental head butts. It doesn't protect much from hard punches.

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In boxing' date=' head gear is intended to stop cuts, mainly from accidental head butts. It doesn't protect much from hard punches.[/quote']

 

It could be all in my head (no pun intended), but for some reason the "shock / headache" feeling you get from being punched in the head actually feels more intense when I'm wearing headgear than when I'm not wearing it. For some reason it feels like the helmet transfers the shock more intense or something.

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My friend and I both train at the same gym' date=' and he has been boxing and doing BJJ for about 10 years longer than I have. Every time we spar he absolutely destroys me, but recently since we were in the same weight class and our gym was having a tournament I ended up having to fight him for real.

 

I was really scared because I knew he could kill me, and I went into the first round thinking "I wonder how long I will last before I get knocked out." Anyways, I landed a cross on him and he immediately fell to the ground and I dove into his guard like an amateur. While he normally submits me really easily, I found that he couldn't do this when I was allowed to throw elbows in his face and punch his rib cage (something we don't simulate when grappling).

 

Eventually the fight got stopped in the first round, and I was declared the winner.

 

I'm now starting to wonder if sparring isn't necessarily the best indicator of how a real fight will go? Or if this was just a fluke?[/quote']

 

Just because someone is a beast in the gym doesn't always mean it will translate well in a fight. Some people are monstrous gym rats but don't perform well in fights and the opposite is true too. Could be nerves, inexperience and or thier training gave them a false sense of security.

 

The thing is you can't really train some things hard or you and your training partners will get banged up and make little to no progress or even get worse. Sparring is just a simulation but it's absolutely neccessary to improve. There is a fine line training as realistic as possible but playful enough you can survive the grind and improve daily.

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It could be all in my head (no pun intended)' date=' but for some reason the "shock / headache" feeling you get from being punched in the head actually feels more intense when I'm wearing headgear than when I'm not wearing it. For some reason it feels like the helmet transfers the shock more intense or something.[/quote']

 

I was also surprised when I first sparred with the headgear and found it's still very jarring. When you're hit without it you feel pain in the surface more which masks the effect on the brain. I think that's what you're experiencing. Ultimately most of the damage comes from your brain getting rattled inside your skull so the headgear only helps so much. The brain is soft (about the consistency of scrambled eggs) so it gets squished easily. I heard of a famous drummer who got boxer's syndrome even though nothing touched his head - just from moving it vigorously side-to-side to the music.

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Yeah right' date=' if you don't spar hard you'll get your *** kicked in a fight. Sounds like you've never even done real sparring. You put on head gear, gloves and shin pads and go all out, just stop if someone is wobbled.[/quote']

 

LOL...what a newb. Not that it matters......but yes I did sparr, I kick boxed for 3 years before going into college.....then I got a life.

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Yeah right' date=' if you don't spar hard you'll get your *** kicked in a fight. Sounds like you've never even done real sparring. You put on head gear, gloves and shin pads and go all out, just stop if someone is wobbled.[/quote']

 

You can't go hard all the time. You need some sessions hard and some more lax.

 

If you always go hard not only will you not improve but you'll get worse because you'll always be injured.

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It depends on the sparring. If you guys dont do any contact sparring in the gym than its not the same at all. If its pretty intense sparring with contact than it would be pretty similar.

On the ground being able to punch changes everything. Congrats on the win!

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your gym lets you throw elbows against each other in an in-house tournament?

 

where do you' date=' cobra kai?[/quote']

 

It wasn't primarily an in-house tournament, but everyone who was certified as a combatives instructor was forced to participate in this tournament (It was all 4 Brigades on post). I also volunteered to fight a few extra fights that day (even outside of my weight class) because some people got injured, others didn't show up, or dropped out, before other guys could get a chance to fight and they needed so many fights in order to get their certification.

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