Jump to content

What will happen when real athletes enter MMA?


MetatronBJJ
 Share

Recommended Posts

Jon Jones is just the tip of the iceberg. I'm not talking about a Lyoto Machida who wins off of technique or drinking piss. I'm talking about the Lebron James type of athlete who trains in mma his whole life. The guy that only needs to know a little bit of sub defense to own any BJJ practitioner or wrestler(GSP of wrestling). The guy that needs just a year of boxing to knock out anyone because he's just that fast and strong. We are in an amazing time in MMA. I predict that DNA and evolution will take over technique very soon. For example, on paper Shogun should have raped Jon Jones with his Muay Thai and BJJ. What do you think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, it will take a long time for someone who's been training in MMA their whole life to join the UFC.

 

The main problem is mom. Mom doesn't want her kids to get hurt. It's a natural thing for moms to protect their children. So, with moms not wanting their kids to get hurt, MMA will never be introduced as a sport in public schools. This fact alone is why the population of MMA is dominated by fighters with high school and college wrestling backgrounds (because wrestling is the closest thing to MMA).

 

As a result, children that are potential superstar athletes choose sports like football, basketball, and baseball because those are what's available.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The main problem is mom. Mom doesn't want her kids to get hurt. It's a natural thing for moms to protect their children.

 

Very good post. In our UFC forum world, the UFC is HUUUUUGEEEEE and everyone wants to be the next UFC champ. In the real world, basketball, baseball, football are so much bigger and have so much more young athletes joining. To make it in the UFC right now if you are fully training every day since a young age is WAY more likely than to make it in the NBA or MLB if you train your whole life

 

You are right OP in that we will see some more jones-caliber athletes that tear through the circuit with less MMA credentials, but there will still be a much larger push to be a basketball or baseball star. Not so much because it's more money, it's more due to the fact that its way more mainstream and parents are not going to have as much fear of injury to their child

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very good post. In our UFC forum world' date=' the UFC is HUUUUUGEEEEE and everyone wants to be the next UFC champ. In the real world, basketball, baseball, football are so much bigger and have so much more young athletes joining. To make it in the UFC right now if you are fully training every day since a young age is WAY more likely than to make it in the NBA or MLB if you train your whole life

 

You are right OP in that we will see some more jones-caliber athletes that tear through the circuit with less MMA credentials, but there will still be a much larger push to be a basketball or baseball star. Not so much because it's more money, it's more due to the fact that its way more mainstream and parents are not going to have as much fear of injury to their child[/quote']

 

Depends on what country you live in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my take on the athleticism vs. skill argument; athleticism wins. Plain and simple. I could pull up dozens of examples from pretty much any sport where a particular athlete was utterly dominate, and even fans of the sport would sit back and say "what could they do if they actually trained hard and/or were disciplined?" So on paper, I am actually in total agreement with the concept of this argument...but here's the catch...MMA already has world caliber athletes.

 

Let's take a guy who's 5'8" or so, brilliant physical specimen, but is just not that "big." American football? That's out, he'd be crushed. Basketball? Not unless you're name is Muggsy Bogues. It's just symptomatic that you will naturally gravitate towards a sport where you can excel. Now, for many stellar athletes who weren't gifted the ability to grow to be skyscrapers and brick walls of muscle mass, historically they ended up in? You guess it, combat sports. Boxing & wrestling (wrestling really only if you're from North America or Eastern Europe). And why is that? Because of weight classes. Boxing especially because there was money to be made. A LOT of money. And even if you weren't a heavyweight, you could make a lot more fighting as a welterweight prize fighter than spending your peak physical years as a second or third string in a development league somewhere.

 

Now, MMA, like boxing, will always struggle to find a slew of top notch athletes in the heavier divisions - because guys who could make maybe a million dollars per year as a heavyweight MMA fighter could make $9 million on an NFL team. That's the nature of the beast. I remember hearing a Frank Mir interview were you talked about how in combat sports, or any sport with weight classes, the most exciting to watch was always the lighter ones because it's the only outlet for small guys who happen to be some of the best athletes on the planet. And it's very true.

 

The point is, MMA already has a smattering of genuine world class athletes in it. Even in the heavier classes, the era of your Tank Abbott's or even a Kimbo Slice is over. And no one takes up boxing and within a year has the ability to KO anyone at will. No one. You greatly underplay the value of a lifetime worth of training in that sport - as well as martial arts on a whole. Will more and more world class athletes be drawn to MMA as pay days increase? Absolutely. But you're underplaying just how many top tier athletes are already a part of this sport today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The elite fighters of the UFC will still remain elite. If you think they aren't world class athletes then I don't know what to tell you.

 

They are martial artists. They are not world class athletes. Brock and Jon Jones are world class athletes. Brock entered MMA too late in his career. That is the difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You mean more black people :confused:

 

Not necessarily. Brock was a world class athlete. He just didn't have the fighting spirit....Most fighters in the UFC have the fighting spirit. You are going to get more fighters in there that don't but are athletic freaks like Brock and Jones as of recent. Then you will get some fighters that are both.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Elite Athletes who play games for a living don't have the chin' date=' heart or balls needed to be a fighter. You play Football, you don't play fighting. MMA is as real as it gets.[/quote']

 

There are Football players who play football because that is the most violent thing they have. What happens when a young Ray Lewis enters MMA or a Mike Tyson skips out on boxing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my take on the athleticism vs. skill argument; athleticism wins. Plain and simple. I could pull up dozens of examples from pretty much any sport where a particular athlete was utterly dominate' date=' and even fans of the sport would sit back and say "what could they do if they actually trained hard and/or were disciplined?" So on paper, I am actually in total agreement with the concept of this argument...but here's the catch...MMA already has world caliber athletes.

 

Let's take a guy who's 5'8" or so, brilliant physical specimen, but is just not that "big." American football? That's out, he'd be crushed. Basketball? Not unless you're name is Muggsy Bogues. It's just symptomatic that you will naturally gravitate towards a sport where you can excel. Now, for many stellar athletes who weren't gifted the ability to grow to be skyscrapers and brick walls of muscle mass, historically they ended up in? You guess it, combat sports. Boxing & wrestling (wrestling really only if you're from North America or Eastern Europe). And why is that? Because of weight classes. Boxing especially because there was money to be made. A LOT of money. And even if you weren't a heavyweight, you could make a lot more fighting as a welterweight prize fighter than spending your peak physical years as a second or third string in a development league somewhere.

 

Now, MMA, like boxing, will always struggle to find a slew of top notch athletes in the heavier divisions - because guys who could make maybe a million dollars per year as a heavyweight MMA fighter could make $9 million on an NFL team. That's the nature of the beast. I remember hearing a Frank Mir interview were you talked about how in combat sports, or any sport with weight classes, the most exciting to watch was always the lighter ones because it's the only outlet for small guys who happen to be some of the best athletes on the planet. And it's very true.

 

The point is, MMA already has a smattering of genuine world class athletes in it. Even in the heavier classes, the era of your Tank Abbott's or even a Kimbo Slice is over. [b']And no one takes up boxing and within a year has the ability to KO anyone at will[/b]. No one. You greatly underplay the value of a lifetime worth of training in that sport - as well as martial arts on a whole. Will more and more world class athletes be drawn to MMA as pay days increase? Absolutely. But you're underplaying just how many top tier athletes are already a part of this sport today.

 

Jones might not be KO'ing anyone but his reach is enough to help his boxing. He's probably a white belt in jiu jitsu but he subs people. Him and Brock are my people of focus in this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my take on the athleticism vs. skill argument; athleticism wins. Plain and simple. I could pull up dozens of examples from pretty much any sport where a particular athlete was utterly dominate' date=' and even fans of the sport would sit back and say "what could they do if they actually trained hard and/or were disciplined?" So on paper, I am actually in total agreement with the concept of this argument...but here's the catch...MMA already has world caliber athletes.

 

Let's take a guy who's 5'8" or so, brilliant physical specimen, but is just not that "big." American football? That's out, he'd be crushed. Basketball? Not unless you're name is Muggsy Bogues. It's just symptomatic that you will naturally gravitate towards a sport where you can excel. Now, for many stellar athletes who weren't gifted the ability to grow to be skyscrapers and brick walls of muscle mass, historically they ended up in? You guess it, combat sports. Boxing & wrestling (wrestling really only if you're from North America or Eastern Europe). And why is that? Because of weight classes. Boxing especially because there was money to be made. A LOT of money. And even if you weren't a heavyweight, you could make a lot more fighting as a welterweight prize fighter than spending your peak physical years as a second or third string in a development league somewhere.

 

Now, MMA, like boxing, will always struggle to find a slew of top notch athletes in the heavier divisions - because guys who could make maybe a million dollars per year as a heavyweight MMA fighter could make $9 million on an NFL team. That's the nature of the beast. I remember hearing a Frank Mir interview were you talked about how in combat sports, or any sport with weight classes, the most exciting to watch was always the lighter ones because it's the only outlet for small guys who happen to be some of the best athletes on the planet. And it's very true.

 

The point is, MMA already has a smattering of genuine world class athletes in it. Even in the heavier classes, the era of your Tank Abbott's or even a Kimbo Slice is over. And no one takes up boxing and within a year has the ability to KO anyone at will. No one. You greatly underplay the value of a lifetime worth of training in that sport - as well as martial arts on a whole. Will more and more world class athletes be drawn to MMA as pay days increase? Absolutely. But you're underplaying just how many top tier athletes are already a part of this sport today.[/quote']

 

Pretty valid point. If you look at the smaller guys they typically are much more conditioned and focused on MMA than the guys you see who are in larger/heavier divisions. I can think of a ton of out of shape LHW, and HW fighters, but really struggle to think of flabby welterweights and lightweights, etc. With the exception of BJ PENN.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Athletic ability isn't the be all end all of sports it just enhances the skillset needed to be sucessful and yes many of the UFC's athletes are in fact world class athletes specifically for fighting. :P

 

Sure they may not be able to beat Usian Bolt in a sprint, they may not be able to jump high enough to dunk a basketball, they may not be able to kick a ball with precision but those feats aren't as needed in MMA.

 

Does it help to be agile, super explosive, fast with amazing endurance...absolutely it does but like i said it's not the be all end all.

 

A super athlete is useless without skills. There's a synergy of athletic ability and skills.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most world class athletes are only world class in one sport.

 

I agree...but that would make all the good top 20 fighter "world class athletes" so this thread is not logical when u (not directed at u) say only a few like Jones and Brock are world class

 

It's a stupid statement when used like that

 

Jones and Brock are world class athletes when it comes to mma but not outside of mma...and so is

 

JDS

Aldo

Cruz

Faber

Belcher

Shogun

Evans

Gsp

Silva

Davis

Bader

Kos

Ect...list goes on and on

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's like why isn't Usain Bolt in the NFL as a wideout or RB, or even MLB as a lead off man? Soccer as a forward? If he could, he would.

 

 

Cause most sports are multi-faceted and require more than just having a lot of athletic potential. The guy who is good at several things is usually better than the guy who is freakily awesome at one thing and average to below average in the rest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jon Jones is just the tip of the iceberg. I'm not talking about a Lyoto Machida who wins off of technique or drinking piss. I'm talking about the Lebron James type of athlete who trains in mma his whole life. The guy that only needs to know a little bit of sub defense to own any BJJ practitioner or wrestler(GSP of wrestling). The guy that needs just a year of boxing to knock out anyone because he's just that fast and strong. We are in an amazing time in MMA. I predict that DNA and evolution will take over technique very soon. For example' date=' on paper Shogun should have raped Jon Jones with his Muay Thai and BJJ. What do you think?[/quote']

 

Last time I checked these fighters are athletes who train not couch potatoes!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Outside of mma what had Brock or Jones done to make them "world class athletes"?

If you don't think wrestlers (real wrestlers, not WWE) are athletes, then you're an idiot. Brock was one of the best real wrestlers in history, which makes him one of the best athletes in the world. He never played football in high school or college and his athleticism alone got him serious consideration from the Minnesota Vikings.

 

You guys who think that there aren't real athletes need to look up the wrestling backgrounds of many of today's fighters, like Koschek for example. Wrestlers are some of the strongest, fastest, most physically fit athletes in the world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The current top mma fighters are amazing athletes. Take a look at GSP, Frankie Edgar or Nick Diaz. These guy train at high levels in so many different disiplines. JJ is not a better athlete than these guys, he is just a HW fighting at LHW. Also mma is fighting. Phelps or Bolt are great athletes by they would probably suck at fighting. Even if they trained for years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

there have already been uber athletes in MMA like Lesnar, Randleman etc who went so far on their athleticism but ultimately they will run into a less athletic wrecking maching like JDS and get eaten. You will get the odd best of both like Jones who is a physical beast and can fight but a lot of the time a super athlete will crumble the first time somone hits them really hard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Outside of mma what had Brock or Jones done to make them "world class athletes"?

 

This term is thrown around to much when its not warranted

 

What? :confused: Brock was in the NFL and Jones has one brother in the NFL, about to have another, and I'm sure he could have been at least a high level college athlete if he wanted, if not professional.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...