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NATE QUARRY with some interesting word's.


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lol^^ um NO.

 

I think it's pretty sad fighters have no say in what sponsors they can have and the whole extreme pricey fee to UFC is rediculous as is a fighter not being able to wear their OWN ****ing created shirt. The new everyone wears the same uniform thing sounds Nazi as ****.

 

Curious. What if a fighter were to give a big F U to UFC by getting a tattoo of a non approved sponsor. Would UFC cut them?

 

 

 

 

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lol^^ um NO.

 

I think it's pretty sad fighters have no say in what sponsors they can have and the whole extreme pricey fee to UFC is rediculous as is a fighter not being able to wear their OWN ****ing created shirt. The new everyone wears the same uniform thing sounds Nazi as ****.

 

Curious. What if a fighter were to give a big F U to UFC by getting a tattoo of a non approved sponsor. Would UFC cut them?

 

 

 

 

You can do it, but do you really want to be the **** with badboy tatted on your chest and a condom depot tramp stamp?

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lol^^ um NO.

 

I think it's pretty sad fighters have no say in what sponsors they can have and the whole extreme pricey fee to UFC is rediculous as is a fighter not being able to wear their OWN ****ing created shirt. The new everyone wears the same uniform thing sounds Nazi as ****.

 

Curious. What if a fighter were to give a big F U to UFC by getting a tattoo of a non approved sponsor. Would UFC cut them?

 

 

 

 

You can do it, but do you really want to be the **** with badboy tatted on your chest and a condom depot tramp stamp?

 

I remember around 10 years ago several boxers had GoldenPalace.com written across their backs, as advertisement. It was like a temporary tattoo.

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lol^^ um NO.

 

I think it's pretty sad fighters have no say in what sponsors they can have and the whole extreme pricey fee to UFC is rediculous as is a fighter not being able to wear their OWN ****ing created shirt. The new everyone wears the same uniform thing sounds Nazi as ****.

 

Curious. What if a fighter were to give a big F U to UFC by getting a tattoo of a non approved sponsor. Would UFC cut them?

 

 

 

 

You can do it, but do you really want to be the **** with badboy tatted on your chest and a condom depot tramp stamp?

 

I remember around 10 years ago several boxers had GoldenPalace.com written across their backs, as advertisement. It was like a temporary tattoo.

 

I'd do temporary tattoo, but I'm sure the UFC would put a stop to it.

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I certainly can sympathize with fighters like Quarry who have been given the short end of the stick in a manner of speaking. But he is absolutely right, it is a business. If you want to be a professional fighter, you SHOULD handle it like a business. Promoters aren't stupid people, and they typically have very qualified lawyers to exploit and maximize profits. Any way they can.

 

You are paid what you negotiate for yourself (or an agent does for you). You must adhere to the rules and regulations of the company you work for. This is true in the UFC, it's true in Microsoft, it's true in Wal-Mart, it's true in every single company. They will pay you only what they expect they can get out of you and will try their best to pay you less than they have to. If you think you're worth more, hold out for more money. If you don't agree with their rules on sponsors, protest or go to some other promotion. And before anyone begins to shout about other promotions not being as big, and not able to pay as much - well - that's the trade off. If you want to work for the #1 fight promotion in the world, you are going to have to play by their rules.

 

Do I agree with it? Absolutely not. Few people have been as outspokenly objecting of Dana White as I have. I have said time and time again, more than Tito, more than Randy or Chuck, more than Brock or Anderson - Dana White is the one person who is most responsible for getting MMA as mainstream and popular as it is. He is also the one person who is going to keep the sport from growing. I've seriously considered the idea that Dana is attempting to keep MMA less popular than it's potential, because if the sport as a whole grows faster than the UFC, he could lose control of the entire industry. But even if it's not by design, he's so foul and objectionable many fans will be turned off by him - and a big part of any sports fantasy for kids is the idea of being rich and famous...well...MMA you don't get world famous athlete rich. The top MMA stars might earn in a year what a mid level NBA player does (roughly $4-6 million). And stories of former champion contenders being bullied around and having their supplemental income restricted won't help that image.

 

But, that's part of life sometimes. If you want to work for the biggest and most dominate in your field, sometimes you're going to have to suck it up and go along with their methods. Or else, roll the dice and see if you can find better financial possibilities elsewhere.

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I certainly can sympathize with fighters like Quarry who have been given the short end of the stick in a manner of speaking. But he is absolutely right, it is a business. If you want to be a professional fighter, you SHOULD handle it like a business. Promoters aren't stupid people, and they typically have very qualified lawyers to exploit and maximize profits. Any way they can.

 

You are paid what you negotiate for yourself (or an agent does for you). You must adhere to the rules and regulations of the company you work for. This is true in the UFC, it's true in Microsoft, it's true in Wal-Mart, it's true in every single company. They will pay you only what they expect they can get out of you and will try their best to pay you less than they have to. If you think you're worth more, hold out for more money. If you don't agree with their rules on sponsors, protest or go to some other promotion. And before anyone begins to shout about other promotions not being as big, and not able to pay as much - well - that's the trade off. If you want to work for the #1 fight promotion in the world, you are going to have to play by their rules.

 

Do I agree with it? Absolutely not. Few people have been as outspokenly objecting of Dana White as I have. I have said time and time again, more than Tito, more than Randy or Chuck, more than Brock or Anderson - Dana White is the one person who is most responsible for getting MMA as mainstream and popular as it is. He is also the one person who is going to keep the sport from growing. I've seriously considered the idea that Dana is attempting to keep MMA less popular than it's potential, because if the sport as a whole grows faster than the UFC, he could lose control of the entire industry. But even if it's not by design, he's so foul and objectionable many fans will be turned off by him - and a big part of any sports fantasy for kids is the idea of being rich and famous...well...MMA you don't get world famous athlete rich. The top MMA stars might earn in a year what a mid level NBA player does (roughly $4-6 million). And stories of former champion contenders being bullied around and having their supplemental income restricted won't help that image.

 

But, that's part of life sometimes. If you want to work for the biggest and most dominate in your field, sometimes you're going to have to suck it up and go along with their methods. Or else, roll the dice and see if you can find better financial possibilities elsewhere.

 

It is a business, but I don't think General Motors would be allowed to buy Ford and Toyota, just to shut them down.

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Everyone should honor their contract they sign, but what the UFC did was a bit different based on what Nate Quarry mentioned.

 

When I signed with the UFC this is what I was told”

 

We can’t pay you much but you can have any sponsors you want.

 

Then: We need to approve your sponsors.

 

Then: You can’t have any conflicting sponsors.

 

Then: You can’t thank your sponsors after fights.

 

Then: We are not approving any sponsors that we don’t like their product.

 

Then: Your sponsors have to pay us a fee of $50,000 for the pleasure to sponsor you.

 

Then: Your sponsors have to pay us a fee of $100,000 for the pleasure to sponsor you.

- See more at: http://www.bjpenn.com/ufc-vet-nate-quarry-speaks-out-against-the-ufc-fighters-just-a-product-to-them-they-dont-care/#sthash.Yk44HanL.dpuf

 

Changing it that much seems excessive. At that point, Nate should be allowed to break his contract since the terms changed and he should be allowed to go elsewhere that offer him a better deal.

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I certainly can sympathize with fighters like Quarry who have been given the short end of the stick in a manner of speaking. But he is absolutely right, it is a business. If you want to be a professional fighter, you SHOULD handle it like a business. Promoters aren't stupid people, and they typically have very qualified lawyers to exploit and maximize profits. Any way they can.

 

You are paid what you negotiate for yourself (or an agent does for you). You must adhere to the rules and regulations of the company you work for. This is true in the UFC, it's true in Microsoft, it's true in Wal-Mart, it's true in every single company. They will pay you only what they expect they can get out of you and will try their best to pay you less than they have to. If you think you're worth more, hold out for more money. If you don't agree with their rules on sponsors, protest or go to some other promotion. And before anyone begins to shout about other promotions not being as big, and not able to pay as much - well - that's the trade off. If you want to work for the #1 fight promotion in the world, you are going to have to play by their rules.

 

Do I agree with it? Absolutely not. Few people have been as outspokenly objecting of Dana White as I have. I have said time and time again, more than Tito, more than Randy or Chuck, more than Brock or Anderson - Dana White is the one person who is most responsible for getting MMA as mainstream and popular as it is. He is also the one person who is going to keep the sport from growing. I've seriously considered the idea that Dana is attempting to keep MMA less popular than it's potential, because if the sport as a whole grows faster than the UFC, he could lose control of the entire industry. But even if it's not by design, he's so foul and objectionable many fans will be turned off by him - and a big part of any sports fantasy for kids is the idea of being rich and famous...well...MMA you don't get world famous athlete rich. The top MMA stars might earn in a year what a mid level NBA player does (roughly $4-6 million). And stories of former champion contenders being bullied around and having their supplemental income restricted won't help that image.

 

But, that's part of life sometimes. If you want to work for the biggest and most dominate in your field, sometimes you're going to have to suck it up and go along with their methods. Or else, roll the dice and see if you can find better financial possibilities elsewhere.

 

It is a business, but I don't think General Motors would be allowed to buy Ford and Toyota, just to shut them down.

 

Monopoly laws seem to have virtually no presence in entertainment and online companies. I am not quite sure why that is, other than the complex nature of trying to determine just what constitutes a monopoly in those fields. We will never see an emergence of another Google or Facebook because if anything, so many laws are in place to protect their undisputed standing. It's a bizarre byproduct of creating an industry built around a single brand, and because you established the industry, you help write the laws as it's being developed. Same thing with the UFC and MMA. So many people today still don't even know what MMA stands for, or is - but they know UFC means Ultimate Fighting. Meanwhile all the athletic commissions, all the legality of the sport has been crafted by the only people at that time who knew anything about MMA, which was the UFC.

 

You're absolutely right, huge merges like your example that would never happen because it would cripple the competitive marketplace. But the MMA industry and the car manufacturing industry are on two entirely different levels of global economic impact. And unlike where Facebook has essentially trademarked the idea of social network, there is technically nothing stopping another promotion from becoming a competitive threat to UFC other than it's easier to build something up and then sell it off to your competitor. If you want to do away with the system, the only real method of that would be to get a group of investors together who want to fund an MMA promotion in perpetuity with little to no financial return, for years on end, and even then have no guarantee of reaching a level remotely the same as UFC.

 

And @MMA_FTW, Those changes happened over a stretch of time. I'm sure he not only renegotiated contracts during that time, which means he would have agreed to the new rules. However even if it all happened over night he could have left his contract if they change the rules and gone to seek employment elsewhere. The point is, few promotions on the planet can offer the kind of money that UFC can. Guys who complain about relative low payouts of 25k or what have you, certainly are smart enough to know they stand to make half that amount elsewhere. The UFC isn't obligated to get involved with a profit share situation with their contracted employees. Just like if Safeway has huge profits, they don't need to share that down the chain to their store managers. Now they might, in a lot of companies they offer options based incentives or share plans, but they don't have to.

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I certainly can sympathize with fighters like Quarry who have been given the short end of the stick in a manner of speaking. But he is absolutely right, it is a business. If you want to be a professional fighter, you SHOULD handle it like a business. Promoters aren't stupid people, and they typically have very qualified lawyers to exploit and maximize profits. Any way they can.

 

You are paid what you negotiate for yourself (or an agent does for you). You must adhere to the rules and regulations of the company you work for. This is true in the UFC, it's true in Microsoft, it's true in Wal-Mart, it's true in every single company. They will pay you only what they expect they can get out of you and will try their best to pay you less than they have to. If you think you're worth more, hold out for more money. If you don't agree with their rules on sponsors, protest or go to some other promotion. And before anyone begins to shout about other promotions not being as big, and not able to pay as much - well - that's the trade off. If you want to work for the #1 fight promotion in the world, you are going to have to play by their rules.

 

Do I agree with it? Absolutely not. Few people have been as outspokenly objecting of Dana White as I have. I have said time and time again, more than Tito, more than Randy or Chuck, more than Brock or Anderson - Dana White is the one person who is most responsible for getting MMA as mainstream and popular as it is. He is also the one person who is going to keep the sport from growing. I've seriously considered the idea that Dana is attempting to keep MMA less popular than it's potential, because if the sport as a whole grows faster than the UFC, he could lose control of the entire industry. But even if it's not by design, he's so foul and objectionable many fans will be turned off by him - and a big part of any sports fantasy for kids is the idea of being rich and famous...well...MMA you don't get world famous athlete rich. The top MMA stars might earn in a year what a mid level NBA player does (roughly $4-6 million). And stories of former champion contenders being bullied around and having their supplemental income restricted won't help that image.

 

But, that's part of life sometimes. If you want to work for the biggest and most dominate in your field, sometimes you're going to have to suck it up and go along with their methods. Or else, roll the dice and see if you can find better financial possibilities elsewhere.

 

It is a business, but I don't think General Motors would be allowed to buy Ford and Toyota, just to shut them down.

 

I certainly can sympathize with fighters like Quarry who have been given the short end of the stick in a manner of speaking. But he is absolutely right, it is a business. If you want to be a professional fighter, you SHOULD handle it like a business. Promoters aren't stupid people, and they typically have very qualified lawyers to exploit and maximize profits. Any way they can.

 

You are paid what you negotiate for yourself (or an agent does for you). You must adhere to the rules and regulations of the company you work for. This is true in the UFC, it's true in Microsoft, it's true in Wal-Mart, it's true in every single company. They will pay you only what they expect they can get out of you and will try their best to pay you less than they have to. If you think you're worth more, hold out for more money. If you don't agree with their rules on sponsors, protest or go to some other promotion. And before anyone begins to shout about other promotions not being as big, and not able to pay as much - well - that's the trade off. If you want to work for the #1 fight promotion in the world, you are going to have to play by their rules.

 

Do I agree with it? Absolutely not. Few people have been as outspokenly objecting of Dana White as I have. I have said time and time again, more than Tito, more than Randy or Chuck, more than Brock or Anderson - Dana White is the one person who is most responsible for getting MMA as mainstream and popular as it is. He is also the one person who is going to keep the sport from growing. I've seriously considered the idea that Dana is attempting to keep MMA less popular than it's potential, because if the sport as a whole grows faster than the UFC, he could lose control of the entire industry. But even if it's not by design, he's so foul and objectionable many fans will be turned off by him - and a big part of any sports fantasy for kids is the idea of being rich and famous...well...MMA you don't get world famous athlete rich. The top MMA stars might earn in a year what a mid level NBA player does (roughly $4-6 million). And stories of former champion contenders being bullied around and having their supplemental income restricted won't help that image.

 

But, that's part of life sometimes. If you want to work for the biggest and most dominate in your field, sometimes you're going to have to suck it up and go along with their methods. Or else, roll the dice and see if you can find better financial possibilities elsewhere.

 

It is a business, but I don't think General Motors would be allowed to buy Ford and Toyota, just to shut them down.

 

Monopoly laws seem to have virtually no presence in entertainment and online companies. I am not quite sure why that is, other than the complex nature of trying to determine just what constitutes a monopoly in those fields. We will never see an emergence of another Google or Facebook because if anything, so many laws are in place to protect their undisputed standing. It's a bizarre byproduct of creating an industry built around a single brand, and because you established the industry, you help write the laws as it's being developed. Same thing with the UFC and MMA. So many people today still don't even know what MMA stands for, or is - but they know UFC means Ultimate Fighting. Meanwhile all the athletic commissions, all the legality of the sport has been crafted by the only people at that time who knew anything about MMA, which was the UFC.

 

You're absolutely right, huge merges like your example that would never happen because it would cripple the competitive marketplace. But the MMA industry and the car manufacturing industry are on two entirely different levels of global economic impact. And unlike where Facebook has essentially trademarked the idea of social network, there is technically nothing stopping another promotion from becoming a competitive threat to UFC other than it's easier to build something up and then sell it off to your competitor. If you want to do away with the system, the only real method of that would be to get a group of investors together who want to fund an MMA promotion in perpetuity with little to no financial return, for years on end, and even then have no guarantee of reaching a level remotely the same as UFC.

 

And @MMA_FTW, Those changes happened over a stretch of time. I'm sure he not only renegotiated contracts during that time, which means he would have agreed to the new rules. However even if it all happened over night he could have left his contract if they change the rules and gone to seek employment elsewhere. The point is, few promotions on the planet can offer the kind of money that UFC can. Guys who complain about relative low payouts of 25k or what have you, certainly are smart enough to know they stand to make half that amount elsewhere. The UFC isn't obligated to get involved with a profit share situation with their contracted employees. Just like if Safeway has huge profits, they don't need to share that down the chain to their store managers. Now they might, in a lot of companies they offer options based incentives or share plans, but they don't have to.

 

I know it happened over a period of time. That's why it would've given me an opportunity to break my contract and seek other employment because the terms have changed so drastically from when the contract was initially signed - that's if I were in Nate's situation.

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