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Banning TRT without a plan of action for fighters is extremely dangerous and irresponsible


Sisti

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So I know there has been whining about TRT, but I wish people realize that a huge percentage of that is ONLINE TROLLING. A LOT of guys use TRT right now, and it's not exactly causing them all to light the world on fire (Mir, Marquardt, Forrest, Rothwell, Chael, Rampage, etc.)

 

One guy who just happens to be extremely gifted (Vitor) is using it and because he's been in MMA forever and has amazing technique, everyone wants to use this as a way to complain.

 

The thing that the athletic commission isn't addressing is how dangerous it is to allow it in the sport and then automatically get rid of it with no warning whatsoever. Did they do any research on what the ramifications are for getting off TRT? It sounds like there will be tons of extremely dangerous issues and that a dependency on it develops once people start.

 

If you're going to even the playing field and help health why not just change the whole bs where people cut 35 pounds and then put on 30 pounds in ONE DAY after weigh-ins? Having weigh-ins 1 hour before the fight to prevent this seems way more responsible and better for the credibility and safety of the sport then just pulling a treatment that half the fighters now NEED to stay healthy. Here's just a few things that happen to people who come off TRT

 

Loss of bone density

Sexual side effects

Loss of muscle and fat mass

Loss of memory

Mood changes (could lead to depression)

 

Just seems like they should have done some sort of basic research of what the best course of action is for the hundreds of MMA fighters who now use TRT because of them and what they could expect now that it's not legal. I have yet to see them do anything to take care of the people whose lives are now affected because of this

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yeah, i agree with MCMAX3000, its a thin line between a sick person and a cheater. In the combat sports, PEDs advantage its not only success it could lead to hurt bad. Besides the fact that medic use of TRT its one thing and professional sports o elite athletes its something else. like 14:1 TRT ratios arent healthy at all.

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I agree that the weigh-ins need to change, but nobody's forcing the fighters to start doing TRT.

 

If they didn't want those consequences you mentioned happening to them they shouldn't have gotten on it in the first place and if they need it to be healthy well they need to either take some time off the sport so they can get better and eventually come back clean or retire.

 

If the commission voted unanimously against it and everybody seems to agree that it's not good for the sport or the fighters for that matter then it needs to go.

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Taking TRT is the individuals responsibility They went in there begging for it.

 

They did it cuz everyone else was doing it...same way everyone is now cutting 25 pounds to fight in their "proper" weight class. You have to adapt to the new environment to be competitive

 

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if your body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

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Having weigh-ins 1 hour before the fight to prevent this seems way more responsible and better for the credibility and safety of the sport then just pulling a treatment that half the fighters now NEED to stay healthy.

 

you do realise they done this in boxing and people were dehydrating and even dying???

 

having weigh ins 1 hour before the fight would do nothing positive for a fight. the only thing it will do is make every fight come down to who is able to handle his weight cut better without keeling over.

 

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So I know there has been whining about TRT, but I wish people realize that a huge percentage of that is ONLINE TROLLING. A LOT of guys use TRT right now, and it's not exactly causing them all to light the world on fire (Mir, Marquardt, Forrest, Rothwell, Chael, Rampage, etc.)

 

One guy who just happens to be extremely gifted (Vitor) is using it and because he's been in MMA forever and has amazing technique, everyone wants to use this as a way to complain.

 

The thing that the athletic commission isn't addressing is how dangerous it is to allow it in the sport and then automatically get rid of it with no warning whatsoever. Did they do any research on what the ramifications are for getting off TRT? It sounds like there will be tons of extremely dangerous issues and that a dependency on it develops once people start.

 

If you're going to even the playing field and help health why not just change the whole bs where people cut 35 pounds and then put on 30 pounds in ONE DAY after weigh-ins? Having weigh-ins 1 hour before the fight to prevent this seems way more responsible and better for the credibility and safety of the sport then just pulling a treatment that half the fighters now NEED to stay healthy. Here's just a few things that happen to people who come off TRT

 

Loss of bone density

Sexual side effects

Loss of muscle and fat mass

Loss of memory

Mood changes (could lead to depression)

 

Just seems like they should have done some sort of basic research of what the best course of action is for the hundreds of MMA fighters who now use TRT because of them and what they could expect now that it's not legal. I have yet to see them do anything to take care of the people whose lives are now affected because of this

Irresponsible is picking up the needle in the 1st place...

 

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

This exactly.

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

 

If the treatment isn't banned by the commission, yes.

 

Why are you playing dumb? You don't support this ban on TrT?

 

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

 

If the "treatment" isn't performance enhancing, yes. Simple concept really.

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

This. The same way someone with bad eyesight (like myself) can't apply for the air force. Tough ****

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

 

That completely depends on what the treatment is. If it's also a performance enhancing steroid, no.

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• The International Olympic Committee did not issue a single testosterone exemption for the 2012 London Olympics, which featured 5,892 male athletes.

 

• The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency issued one testosterone exemption last year among the thousands of elite-level athletes under its jurisdiction.

 

• Major League Baseball has issued six exemptions to athletes over the past six seasons -- an average of 1,200 players populate its rosters each season.

 

• National Football League officials say testosterone exemptions are "very rare" and only a "handful" have been issued since 1990. Nearly 2,000 players circulate through rosters each season.

 

• No pro boxer is known to have had an exemption issued through a state athletic commission, and Nevada officials said they have never even received an application.

 

I think it's fair to say MMA fighters are blatantly cheating.

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if your body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

that's like saying banning steroids is a horrible idea, people will still find ways to inject them, but in a more dangerous way.

 

just cuz some people will still cheat doesn't mean you should allow the whole organization to cheat

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if your body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

that's like saying banning steroids is a horrible idea, people will still find ways to inject them, but in a more dangerous way.

 

just cuz some people will still cheat doesn't mean you should allow the whole organization to cheat

 

No, it's more about fighter safety. Making PEDs illegal is safer for the competitors. Having weigh-ins the day before is safer for the fighters.

 

They will cut large amounts to make weight whether or not the weigh-ins take place the day of or the day before. It's a measure to protect the fighters from their own bad judgment.

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So I know there has been whining about TRT, but I wish people realize that a huge percentage of that is ONLINE TROLLING. A LOT of guys use TRT right now, and it's not exactly causing them all to light the world on fire (Mir, Marquardt, Forrest, Rothwell, Chael, Rampage, etc.)

 

One guy who just happens to be extremely gifted (Vitor) is using it and because he's been in MMA forever and has amazing technique, everyone wants to use this as a way to complain.

 

The thing that the athletic commission isn't addressing is how dangerous it is to allow it in the sport and then automatically get rid of it with no warning whatsoever. Did they do any research on what the ramifications are for getting off TRT? It sounds like there will be tons of extremely dangerous issues and that a dependency on it develops once people start.

 

If you're going to even the playing field and help health why not just change the whole bs where people cut 35 pounds and then put on 30 pounds in ONE DAY after weigh-ins? Having weigh-ins 1 hour before the fight to prevent this seems way more responsible and better for the credibility and safety of the sport then just pulling a treatment that half the fighters now NEED to stay healthy. Here's just a few things that happen to people who come off TRT

 

Loss of bone density

Sexual side effects

Loss of muscle and fat mass

Loss of memory

Mood changes (could lead to depression)

 

Just seems like they should have done some sort of basic research of what the best course of action is for the hundreds of MMA fighters who now use TRT because of them and what they could expect now that it's not legal. I have yet to see them do anything to take care of the people whose lives are now affected because of this

 

My problem with vitor using it, is that he's actually been caught juicing before.

 

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if your body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

that's like saying banning steroids is a horrible idea, people will still find ways to inject them, but in a more dangerous way.

 

just cuz some people will still cheat doesn't mean you should allow the whole organization to cheat

 

No, it's more about fighter safety. Making PEDs illegal is safer for the competitors. Having weigh-ins the day before is safer for the fighters.

 

They will cut large amounts to make weight whether or not the weigh-ins take place the day of or the day before. It's a measure to protect the fighters from their own bad judgment.

 

There has been more deaths in collegiate wrestling from same day weigh ins then in any mma related deaths

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You guys honestly need to stop it with this stuff about their health. Which of these fighters were showing any signs of health issues before they started TRT? They didn't start taking it due to their health, they were taking it to enhance their performance and were achieving levels much greater than normal. It might cause them to have to retire, but that's life. You can't fight forever, especially if you took shortcuts earlier in your career that lead you to this point. I agree that it shouldn't have been allowed in the first place, but it isn't the health concern you are making it out to be.

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if your body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

that's like saying banning steroids is a horrible idea, people will still find ways to inject them, but in a more dangerous way.

 

just cuz some people will still cheat doesn't mean you should allow the whole organization to cheat

 

No, it's more about fighter safety. Making PEDs illegal is safer for the competitors. Having weigh-ins the day before is safer for the fighters.

 

They will cut large amounts to make weight whether or not the weigh-ins take place the day of or the day before. It's a measure to protect the fighters from their own bad judgment.

 

There has been more deaths in collegiate wrestling from same day weigh ins then in any mma related deaths

 

So you think same day weigh-ins are good for MMA?

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if your body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

that's like saying banning steroids is a horrible idea, people will still find ways to inject them, but in a more dangerous way.

 

just cuz some people will still cheat doesn't mean you should allow the whole organization to cheat

 

No, it's more about fighter safety. Making PEDs illegal is safer for the competitors. Having weigh-ins the day before is safer for the fighters.

 

They will cut large amounts to make weight whether or not the weigh-ins take place the day of or the day before. It's a measure to protect the fighters from their own bad judgment.

 

There has been more deaths in collegiate wrestling from same day weigh ins then in any mma related deaths

 

So you think same day weigh-ins are good for MMA?

How exactly did you come to that conclusion from what he said, lol?

 

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if your body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

that's like saying banning steroids is a horrible idea, people will still find ways to inject them, but in a more dangerous way.

 

just cuz some people will still cheat doesn't mean you should allow the whole organization to cheat

 

No, it's more about fighter safety. Making PEDs illegal is safer for the competitors. Having weigh-ins the day before is safer for the fighters.

 

They will cut large amounts to make weight whether or not the weigh-ins take place the day of or the day before. It's a measure to protect the fighters from their own bad judgment.

 

you can't be serious

 

making fighter's automatically get off TRT is extremely unhealthy. putting a measure in to stop fighters from losing and gaining 30 pounds in a span of one day each (so 60 pound weight fluctuation in 2 days) is definitely in the best interest in the fighters.

 

also, you put measures in place that doesn't allow them to cheat the system. that means you will be watched the hour leading to the fight so you don't pull some crap. look at jake shields first fight in the UFC...DW should have fired him or put him on notice for abusing his body in that way. it's extremely obvious who is cheating the weight system and who is not. when you're at a point where 99% of the fighters abuse the system just to weigh the same at the end, there's a problem.

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

 

I think a person needs to follow their doctors orders on things like hormone replacement therapy. There are many legitimate reasons for it. But you can't fight in combat sports if you are undergoing this. That should be a given. We shouldn't even be arguing about it.

 

 

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Hold that thought. I can't think straight without my daily dose of TRT. Let me go get those shots so I can debate better and destroy your argument. Brb. We can't have this debate in Vegas though. I'll pull out if we do. Because even though TRT doesn't help, I'd rather not do it there.

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

 

If the "treatment" isn't performance enhancing, yes. Simple concept really.

 

How many treatments, prescribed by doctors, don't enhance performance?

 

If a fighter has diabetes and uses insulin, he's using a performance enhancing treatment.

 

If a fighter is blind and uses contacts, he's using a performance enhancing treatment.

 

I could go on and on, but my point is that if they disallow this treatment, it could be perceived as discrimination. I don't think the solution should be to ban substances, it should be to test for abuse of them. They can test every fighter every time and see where his levels are at. It would be a fair, less discriminatory, practice.

 

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

 

If the "treatment" isn't performance enhancing, yes. Simple concept really.

 

How many treatments, prescribed by doctors, don't enhance performance?

 

If a fighter has diabetes and uses insulin, he's using a performance enhancing treatment.

 

If a fighter is blind and uses contacts, he's using a performance enhancing treatment.

 

I could go on and on, but my point is that if they disallow this treatment, it could be perceived as discrimination. I don't think the solution should be to ban substances, it should be to test for abuse of them. They can test every fighter every time and see where his levels are at. It would be a fair, less discriminatory, practice.

 

You done went full retard. Never go full retard.

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Anyone who can no longer fight at an elite level without TRT, shouldn't have been doing so anyway. Whether prescribed or not, if you're body won't allow you to compete, retire. It happens in every other sport, usually to little fanfare or outcry from the fans.

 

As for the weight cutting comment, I personally think day-of weigh ins would be a horrible idea. Fighters would still try to cut to make weight and there would be more injuries, not to mention incredibly sloppy, mismatched fights, due to depletion/exhaustion.

 

"If you're body won't allow you to compete, retire".

 

But what if someone has a condition, like hypogonadism, in which they need the testosterone injection to live a normal life, and it has been with them their entire life?

 

Then they don't meet the requirements for the job called "MMA Fighter".

 

Ohh, I see.

 

So what if a fighter has another condition, not testosterone related? Are they allowed to receive treatment for that?

 

If the "treatment" isn't performance enhancing, yes. Simple concept really.

 

How many treatments, prescribed by doctors, don't enhance performance?

 

If a fighter has diabetes and uses insulin, he's using a performance enhancing treatment.

 

If a fighter is blind and uses contacts, he's using a performance enhancing treatment.

 

I could go on and on, but my point is that if they disallow this treatment, it could be perceived as discrimination. I don't think the solution should be to ban substances, it should be to test for abuse of them. They can test every fighter every time and see where his levels are at. It would be a fair, less discriminatory, practice.

 

You done went full retard. Never go full retard.

 

I was just using the definition given to me. Ironically, going "full retard" is seemingly the only way to engage some of you on an intellectual level.

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Bottom line...they knew what TRT was right off the bat...they should have just never made it legal in the first place

 

That's the thing. No commission ever sat down and voted whether or not TRT should be legal, it just pretty much showed up on their doorstep one night.

 

You and Najma have been absolutely going full retard with the recent threads and posts you guys have made. These fighters aren't going to die without their precious TRT lmao. TRT is mainly for middle to older aged males with ED.

 

There are plenty of natural ways to increase your testosterone. Injecting synthetic testosterone, among it's many advantages most notably greatly increases muscular endurance. In a combat sport that benefit is huge. It should be banned. It should have been banned years ago. Time to move on..

 

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Bottom line...they knew what TRT was right off the bat...they should have just never made it legal in the first place

 

That's the thing. No commission ever sat down and voted whether or not TRT should be legal, it just pretty much showed up on their doorstep one night.

 

You and Najma have been absolutely going full retard with the recent threads and posts you guys have made. These fighters aren't going to die without their precious TRT lmao. TRT is mainly for middle to older aged males with ED.

 

There are plenty of natural ways to increase your testosterone. Injecting synthetic testosterone, among it's many advantages most notably greatly increases muscular endurance. In a combat sport that benefit is huge. It should be banned. It should have been banned years ago. Time to move on..

 

Bro, these fighters take it not to die.

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