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home made jerky.


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I have a dehydrator and I've made a couple of batches.

 

Its ****ing awesome. Usually lasts about 10 mins once people know I've done it lol.

 

You just starting or been doing it a while?

used to make it every year, just started again this year.

 

it drys/smokes for about 3 days. i got the seasoning down pretty good too.

 

 

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I have a dehydrator and I've made a couple of batches.

 

Its ****ing awesome. Usually lasts about 10 mins once people know I've done it lol.

 

You just starting or been doing it a while?

used to make it every year, just started again this year.

 

it drys/smokes for about 3 days. i got the seasoning down pretty good too.

 

 

Nice, natural wood smoke makes the best jerky hands down. The dehydrator works well takes about two to three days but you don't get the same result. I'll get a good steak, rump and new york work well, and marinate it overnight in a mix of whatever I have in the cupboard, usually soy, bbq, tomato, garlic and spices with lots of pepper and smoked paprika.

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I have a dehydrator and I've made a couple of batches.

 

Its ****ing awesome. Usually lasts about 10 mins once people know I've done it lol.

 

You just starting or been doing it a while?

used to make it every year, just started again this year.

 

it drys/smokes for about 3 days. i got the seasoning down pretty good too.

 

 

Nice, natural wood smoke makes the best jerky hands down. The dehydrator works well takes about two to three days but you don't get the same result. I'll get a good steak, rump and new york work well, and marinate it overnight in a mix of whatever I have in the cupboard, usually soy, bbq, tomato, garlic and spices with lots of pepper and smoked paprika. word i could pm you my recipe if you'd like but there are some people here who don't deserve it.

 

 

 

EDIT: better yet PM me your e-mail, there's even some mods who I don't want having it.

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I have a dehydrator and I've made a couple of batches.

 

Its ****ing awesome. Usually lasts about 10 mins once people know I've done it lol.

 

You just starting or been doing it a while?

used to make it every year, just started again this year.

 

it drys/smokes for about 3 days. i got the seasoning down pretty good too.

 

 

Nice, natural wood smoke makes the best jerky hands down. The dehydrator works well takes about two to three days but you don't get the same result. I'll get a good steak, rump and new york work well, and marinate it overnight in a mix of whatever I have in the cupboard, usually soy, bbq, tomato, garlic and spices with lots of pepper and smoked paprika. word i could pm you my recipe if you'd like but there are some people here who don't deserve it.

 

 

I'd love to try it, shoot us a pm when you get a chance bro

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I have a dehydrator and I've made a couple of batches.

 

Its ****ing awesome. Usually lasts about 10 mins once people know I've done it lol.

 

You just starting or been doing it a while?

 

This ^^^ I've also used box fans strapped together with bungee cords and the meat sandwiched between air filters LoL it works good

 

Dehydrator is much easier so it's my preferred method, I usually wait until I find good meat on sale at a good price as I don't hunt

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Never really saw the point as it's not really necessary in modern times unless you're going on a long trip and don't want the meat to spoil.

 

I'd rather just cook it fresh and juicy and eat it right then rather than gnawing on a dried out piece of meat.

 

It's not about necessity. It just tastes really good when its done right Lol If you've only ever had store bought stuff you're not getting the true experience. When its home made its food at it's finest.

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Never really saw the point as it's not really necessary in modern times unless you're going on a long trip and don't want the meat to spoil.

 

I'd rather just cook it fresh and juicy and eat it right then rather than gnawing on a dried out piece of meat.

 

It's not about necessity. It just tastes really good when its done right Lol If you've only ever had store bought stuff you're not getting the true experience. When its home made its food at it's finest.

 

I've had home made jerky before. It certainly taste good i'm just not a fan of gnawing on dry meat i guess.

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Never really saw the point as it's not really necessary in modern times unless you're going on a long trip and don't want the meat to spoil.

 

I'd rather just cook it fresh and juicy and eat it right then rather than gnawing on a dried out piece of meat.

 

It's not about necessity. It just tastes really good when its done right Lol If you've only ever had store bought stuff you're not getting the true experience. When its home made its food at it's finest.

 

I've had home made jerky before. It certainly taste good i'm just not a fan of gnawing on dry meat i guess.

 

texture is just as important as flavour

Going to give this a shot. I buy store bought but that ish is expensive and I could use the extra protein. Is it better with a dehydrator or a stove?

 

dehydrator is super easy and you cant really **** things up so recommended

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Hasn't come through bro, been checkin my mail, but no luck.

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Hasn't come through bro, been checkin my mail, but no luck. I'll send again, you should have PM'd me. (I know you're not the one to harp on people)

 

 

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Hasn't come through bro, been checkin my mail, but no luck. I'll send again, you should have PM'd me. (I know you're not the one to harp on people)

 

 

I just figured you were busy or something ill pm you another email I use just in case. Thanks bro

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

Bro, my recipe is so similar, it's scary. I don't use soy sauce just double up on the Worcestershire

 

 

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LOL at you guys protecting your "secret jerky recipes" they are nearly all almost the same and whoever gave it to you got it from some hunting magazine. Unless you guys are selling your jerky you should share the recipes.
do you put ketchup on jerky?

 

 

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

No way you figured this out on your own. You must have had help from aliens.

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

No way you figured this out on your own. You must have had help from aliens.

 

It was actually my father-in-law's idea. We tinker with different jerky recipes all the time but our batches always came out brittle. So we brainstormed ideas to keep the slices tender, but not unfinished. This was the result of that session and by far the best batch yet. He's retired so he's always cooking weird stuff and we both just kind of like jerky.

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else

 

Kevbo and TheHNIC s recipies are similar and top notch. I think that would be a great guide. The only thing I could really suggest would be to experiment with the spices you like. Maybe a bit of tomato paste, chilli or cayenne. Like I said Im really loose with how I do it, I'll pretty much throw in whatever I have in my cupboards into the marinade lol

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else@TigerChamp @_TUF1_ what are you two using to dry the meat?

 

A dehydrator, smoker, oven?

 

 

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else@TigerChamp @_TUF1_ what are you two using to dry the meat?

 

A dehydrator, smoker, oven?

 

 

An oven but if the textures not right i might invest in a dehydrator. Any tips for using an oven.

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else@TigerChamp @_TUF1_ what are you two using to dry the meat?

 

A dehydrator, smoker, oven?

 

An oven but if the textures not right i might invest in a dehydrator. Any tips for using an oven.

 

I did it in an oven a couple of times, just make sure you line the bottom of that beach with foil. I'd try to make a sort of retainer wall around the edges of the foil too. Move your oven grill to the 2nd slot from the top, and set those strips right on that beach. Being that it's an oven, it isn't going to take 24 hours to dry it out. It will probably take no more than 3-4 hrs. I wouldn't set the temperature higher than 150 degrees. Propping the oven open with a wooden spoon will dry it faster. Also if you have a oven fan, make sure that it's circulating.

 

Check it after 2-3 hrs to see how the texture is. If you fold the meat and the fibers begin to tear then it's time to take it out and let it cool.

 

EDIT sometimes you can't tell if it's truely done until after it's cooled for an hour. If you notice it isn't done after cooling for an hour just sick it back in the oven for another 30 min to an hour, no big deal.

 

Also don't bag the jerky immediately, let it sit at room temperature for 24 hours. (loosely place cellophane over it to keep airborne pathogens off of it.)

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else@TigerChamp @_TUF1_ what are you two using to dry the meat?

 

A dehydrator, smoker, oven?

 

An oven but if the textures not right i might invest in a dehydrator. Any tips for using an oven.

 

I did it in an oven a couple times, just make sure you line the bottom of that beach with foil. I'd try to make a sort of retainer wall around the edges of the foil too. Move your oven grill to the 2nd slot from the top, and set those strips right on that beach. Being that it's an oven, it isn't going to take 24 hours to dry it out. It will probably take no more than 3-4 hrs. I wouldn't set the temperature higher than 150 degrees. Propping the oven open with a wooden spoon will dry it faster. Also if you have a fan, make sure that it's circulating.

 

Check it after 2-3 hrs to see how the texture is. If you try to fold the meat and the fibers begin to tear then it's time to take it out and let it cool.

 

thanks broseph. Interested to see how much i actually get out of it to see if it's more cost efficient than store bought. Will let you know how it turns out.

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Dry your meat with a blower at ambient temperature if you're looking for a softer texture. I promise you won't be disappointed. It still has some "tooth" to it, but you won't have to gnaw and pull to get a good bite. I really wish I could post my picture from my phone. However, I'll try to paint a mental picture for you.

 

 

A small industrial blower works best, but I suppose you can use a smaller high velocity fan. Face it to the ceiling, then place a wooden frame over it, allowing a path for the air to circulate up. Place an HVAC AC filter on top of the wooden frame and place your slices accordingly. Layer these about 3 filters deep, counter weight the top and wait. I've always found heat tends to toughen the meat toward the brittle end of the jerky spectrum.

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else@TigerChamp @_TUF1_ what are you two using to dry the meat?

 

A dehydrator, smoker, oven?

 

 

I use a dehydrator, its got preset temps for meat and fruit. I set it to about 55C which is about 130F. Depending on how thick the meat is it dries in about 8 hours, then I let it sit for a further 12 hours or so. can do it faster at a higher temp but its hard to get the right balance of remaining moisture.

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I have the best homemade recipe ever, but I'll only give it if someone will actually try it and posts their results.
Agreed, i sent my recipe to @TigerChamp , I hope he tries it.

 

 

Screw PM. This new technique has just turned out some of the best jerky I have ever made. In fact it IS the best jerky I have ever made……

 

Obviously the flavor will always be dependent on the recipe used, and I have never had much problem with that. However I have historically tended to use a dehydrator at its lowest temperature setting to dry the meat. Although I have made some very reasonable jerky this way I have always battled to get the texture and softness I wished for. It was always incredibly difficult to dry the meat sufficiently and not turn it into something that was stiff and brittle.

 

I believe I have finally sorted this…..

 

After some thought I eventually decided to use the arrangement you see in the photograph. To be honest you could not have come up with a simpler or easier (or cleaner) technique.

 

As you can see, I used a heavy-duty blower angled up to the air filters upon which the meat had been layered. The lower three trays in the picture below contain the meat, and the upper tray is just a means to keep the whole lot clean. I think the key improvement is that the air is blowing at ambient temperature (about 70°F) and there is no heating at all. I think the price of the pack of four filters was $3.45 at Wal-Mart. The filters themselves are resting on a horizontal/rectangular wooden frame with wooden doweling cross supports. (It is fairly sturdy and would probably take a 30 pound load). Total drying time for the meat was in the order of 24 hours.

 

I have already done two batches this way (about 3 kg in total) using different recipes.

 

This was the first recipe I used, giving the proportions:

 

· 2 pounds beef round steak, cut into thin strips

 

· 1/4 cup soy sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

 

· 2 tablespoons liquid smoke

 

· 2 tablespoons brown sugar

 

· 2 teaspoons salt

 

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

 

· 1 teaspoon meat tenderizer

 

· 1 teaspoon garlic powder

 

· 1 teaspoon onion powder

 

· 1 teaspoon paprika

 

I mixed all the ingredients in a 1 gallon Ziploc bag (resting within a bowl), then added the beef strips, excluded the air and then zipped the bag closed. All in all it was marinated for about eight hours, with the bag being turned over approximately every two hours .

 

The next step is to try this technique with biltong.

 

 

Edit... tried attaching the picture of the blower, filters, and wood frame but it didn't work.

 

lol damn i came in here to say my meats in the fridge marinating but I wish i would have seen this post before i went to the grocery store. I saw a few recipes online that said soy sauce and worcestershire sauce but i played it safe and just used olive oil, vinegar, brown sugar, and salt for the marinate. Any tips for seasonings @Kevbo_Jones‌ @TheHNIC‌ @TigerChamp‌ or anybody else@TigerChamp @_TUF1_ what are you two using to dry the meat?

 

A dehydrator, smoker, oven?

 

 

I use a dehydrator, its got preset temps for meat and fruit. I set it to about 55C which is about 130F. Depending on how thick the meat is it dries in about 8 hours, then I let it sit for a further 12 hours or so. can do it faster at a higher temp but its hard to get the right balance of remaining moisture.yeah, that's S.O.P. for a dehydrator. kevbos idea is original though, i may try it next time.

 

 

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Going to give this a shot. I buy store bought but that ish is expensive and I could use the extra protein. Is it better with a dehydrator or a stove?
dehydrator, and just to be clear. I never said it was cheaper to DIY. I mean it can be, if you know what meat to look for and find it cheap. Most of the time after seasonings it's about the same. I end up hooking my hommies up with a bag here and there.

 

It's just apples and oranges. As most things are, homemade is just better.

 

 

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