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Seattle minimum wage to climb to $15 per hour after city council decision


chons

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On one hand, they just brought out a lot of unemployed people into the labor force.

 

On the other hand, numerous small business owners will be forced to trim back their workforce.

 

Or jack their prices. Either way I dont live there so its not more of my money getting fisted. We shall see though.

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On one hand, they just brought out a lot of unemployed people into the labor force.

 

On the other hand, numerous small business owners will be forced to trim back their workforce.

 

Or jack their prices. Either way I dont live there so its not more of my money getting fisted. We shall see though.

 

What are your thoughts on huge companies already making huge profits, jacking their prices over this?

 

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

 

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Glad I went to school to save lives for less than Seattles minimum wage.

 

essentially this ^^^ where can i refund my degree

 

At the U.S Army recruiting station, just ask for them to repay your student loans as an enlistment incentive.

 

I had a buddy that got them to repay is his student loans, then he out-jewed the VA and got them to give him the GI bill to pay for law school when he got out.

 

Now he's a Jew lawyer that lives in Florida. True story.

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Glad I went to school to save lives for less than Seattles minimum wage.

 

essentially this ^^^ where can i refund my degree

 

At the U.S Army recruiting station, just ask for them to repay your student loans as an enlistment incentive.

 

I had a buddy that got them to repay is his student loans, then he out-jewed the VA and got them to give him the GI bill to pay for law school when he got out.

 

Now he's a Jew lawyer that lives in Florida. True story.

 

If I could go back 4 years, after I graduated and before I got married and had a family I would in a heart beat but I only have roughly 15k left in loans and have no desire to enlist at this point. Side note my wife cheated on her ex husband while he was enlisted so idk if 15k is worth thinking about somebody else givin her the D while i'm overseas lol

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So, this seems like an ego issue with some people?

 

Has nothing to do with ego personally. Yes it's disheartening that I spent 4 years on an education that virtually pays the same as their minimum wage but such a drastic increase overnight like this won't end well. I will be rooting for it to fail tbh so other states don't follow suit. The layoffs alone are reason enough for me to protest this. How many businesses, smaller businesses in particular will have to lay off employees to make up for the wage increase. I owned a small business a couple years back and only had one employee and broke even every month until I was forced to close 9 months later.

 

Their is very little upside to this. And for people that do get laid off will have a harder time finding work because everybody will sit on their jobs now that their getting paid management money. Unless this is temporary for some kind of stimulant for Seattle, this is a bad news.

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So, this seems like an ego issue with some people?

 

Has nothing to do with ego personally. Yes it's disheartening that I spent 4 years on an education that virtually pays the same as their minimum wage but such a drastic increase overnight like this won't end well. I will be rooting for it to fail tbh so other states don't follow suit. The layoffs alone are reason enough for me to protest this. How many businesses, smaller businesses in particular will have to lay off employees to make up for the wage increase. I owned a small business a couple years back and only had one employee and broke even every month until I was forced to close 9 months later.

 

Their is very little upside to this. And for people that do get laid off will have a harder time finding work because everybody will sit on their jobs now that their getting paid management money. Unless this is temporary for some kind of stimulant for Seattle, this is a bad news.

 

Sorry, but I can't help be read ego problem all over your reply. Rooting for it to fail is weak IMO, better to root for it to work, across the board.

 

Read the article, this isn't an overnight thing.

 

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So, this seems like an ego issue with some people?

 

Has nothing to do with ego personally. Yes it's disheartening that I spent 4 years on an education that virtually pays the same as their minimum wage but such a drastic increase overnight like this won't end well. I will be rooting for it to fail tbh so other states don't follow suit. The layoffs alone are reason enough for me to protest this. How many businesses, smaller businesses in particular will have to lay off employees to make up for the wage increase. I owned a small business a couple years back and only had one employee and broke even every month until I was forced to close 9 months later.

 

Their is very little upside to this. And for people that do get laid off will have a harder time finding work because everybody will sit on their jobs now that their getting paid management money. Unless this is temporary for some kind of stimulant for Seattle, this is a bad news.

 

Sorry, but I can't help be read ego problem all over your reply. Rooting for it to fail is weak IMO, better to root for it to work, across the board.

 

Read the article, this isn't an overnight thing.

 

I don't even understand what ego has to do with it. I would feel the same with or without an education. I just don't see how the upside outweighs the obvious flaws with this system.

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On one hand, they just brought out a lot of unemployed people into the labor force.

 

On the other hand, numerous small business owners will be forced to trim back their workforce.

instead of creating jobs that deserve that as a base/starting wage.

 

 

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

The average Journeyman lineman salary is $28 with the low end being $13 an hour.

 

What's the incentive of going to school as a lineman or some job like that if your average starting salary is the same as the guy that bakes your pizza or flips your burgers with zero education? You have to pay your managers more than your lowest employees so their wages go up too. You could be an assistant manager at Pizza Hut making $35k a year with no education and only a couple of years of experience or you could pay $20,000 for school, and then work in ****ty weather for 5-10 years making $17 an hour before you get enough experience to move up and make good money.

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

 

...Because utility workers have a job that's a necessity and usually requires training in a trade school. Putting burgers on a rotary broiler and dropping fry baskets in grease does not. This isn't even considering the economic ramifications of the situation. One should get paid what they're worth is to their company. Not what big government liberals mandate.

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damn

 

legal weed. $15 an hour for **** jobs. what more could a guy ask for ?

 

just as i started my own franchise. IDYB's Abortion Pizzaria

 

its located conveniently located right next to the abortion clinic - our #1 supplier of product. we even have a diner in the front where people can sit down and eat and our servers deliver them their meal. ive even got a sign boy out front that stands around in a dead baby costume with a fork through him, who waves around our company sign yelling "Your loss is our sauce!" at people who pass by.

 

thank god i dont live in seattle! that would be a nightmare trying to pay the bills when minimum wage just skyrocketed to $15 an hour and we have to pay all of our servers, our sign guy, our coathanger technician, our blender b!tch, our batter boy, and our oven/microwave/toaster specialist about $9 an hour more than what they are worth for such a mindless and easy job!

 

speaking of which @bjjnoob we could use another server. our last one didnt pan out very well. she faints at the sight of blood. The position is still available if youre interested. Also if youre good at using a blender let me know. our last one is lazy and is always eating our product or drinking our sauce on the job, and our batter boy never washes his hands before handling our product.

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LoL When I worked for minimum wage as a teenager I got paid $5.15 a hour and I'm only 28 years old. Are there others on here that worked for an even lower minimum wage?

 

That's what I made at my first job and then worked wheat and corn harvest for my uncle and made $12 an hour cash. I remember when I thought that was a lot. We should be making people earn their money and raises instead of starting at $15.

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

The average Journeyman lineman salary is $28 with the low end being $13 an hour.

 

What's the incentive of going to school as a lineman or some job like that if your average starting salary is the same as the guy that bakes your pizza or flips your burgers with zero education? You have to pay your managers more than your lowest employees so their wages go up too. You could be an assistant manager at Pizza Hut making $35k a year with no education and only a couple of years of experience or you could pay $20,000 for school, and then work in ****ty weather for 5-10 years making $17 an hour before you get enough experience to move up and make good money. No Journeyman lineman is making 13. That's apprentice wages (maybe that's what you meant)

 

 

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On one hand, they just brought out a lot of unemployed people into the labor force.

 

On the other hand, numerous small business owners will be forced to trim back their workforce.

 

Or jack their prices. Either way I dont live there so its not more of my money getting fisted. We shall see though.

 

What are your thoughts on huge companies already making huge profits, jacking their prices over this?

 

I feel nothing about it. You still have a choice.

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why should someone on minimum wage make enough to afford lavish luxuries? I know I sound like a **** but if you only make minimum wage you should have a ****ing iPhone while eating at god damn red lobster thinking about which video game console you're are going to buy all the while deciding which car you plan on driving...

 

Also, why should they make more than current military personnel lol? (exaggeration but the military are paid poorly)

 

That's a lot of money for being able to perform a remedial job requiring no experience, education, or adequate training.

 

 

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

The average Journeyman lineman salary is $28 with the low end being $13 an hour.

 

What's the incentive of going to school as a lineman or some job like that if your average starting salary is the same as the guy that bakes your pizza or flips your burgers with zero education? You have to pay your managers more than your lowest employees so their wages go up too. You could be an assistant manager at Pizza Hut making $35k a year with no education and only a couple of years of experience or you could pay $20,000 for school, and then work in ****ty weather for 5-10 years making $17 an hour before you get enough experience to move up and make good money. No Journeyman lineman is making 13. That's apprentice wages (maybe that's what you meant)

 

 

I got those stats online but I thought it was quite low as well. A few sites had different wages. A few others had starting pay at $17-$18 which I know is more accurate around here starting out.

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why should someone on minimum wage make enough to afford lavish luxuries? I know I sound like a **** but if you only make minimum wage you should have a ****ing iPhone while eating at god damn red lobster thinking about which video game console you're are going to buy all the while deciding which car you plan on driving...

 

Also, why should they make more than current military personnel lol? (exaggeration but the military are paid poorly)

 

That's a lot of money for being able to perform a remedial job requiring no experience, education, or adequate training.

 

 

clearly the answer is obvious. they should buy a PS4.

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I'm for any system that allows @Megasoup‌ an opportunity to survive. Homeless people with no skills whatsoever, who use the internet need some way to earn a living.

 

My friend, I'm a journeyman carpenter. I also held a license as a Real Estate Broker, opening my own brokerage at the tender age of 26.

 

I tend bar, true, but I'm not like an Applebee's bartender. I'm more like Tom Cruise's character in ****tail.

 

I'm back in St. Louis and I have control of my mind. I was just offered a position as the head bartender at El Paisano's; a chain of restaurants in this area. In addition to revamping our behind-the bar operations at our new location and others, I will also be finishing the construction of an outdoor patio in the Mid-town area, where a lot of special events will be taking place, as well as helping to coordinate the upcoming Salsa events that we will be throwing there. The owner also has an interest in getting opening up coffee bistros, and our plan is for me to design, construct and operate those, as well.

 

You underestimate me. That's okay.

 

 

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

The average Journeyman lineman salary is $28 with the low end being $13 an hour.

 

What's the incentive of going to school as a lineman or some job like that if your average starting salary is the same as the guy that bakes your pizza or flips your burgers with zero education? You have to pay your managers more than your lowest employees so their wages go up too. You could be an assistant manager at Pizza Hut making $35k a year with no education and only a couple of years of experience or you could pay $20,000 for school, and then work in ****ty weather for 5-10 years making $17 an hour before you get enough experience to move up and make good money. No Journeyman lineman is making 13. That's apprentice wages (maybe that's what you meant)

 

 

I got those stats online but I thought it was quite low as well. A few sites had different wages. A few others had starting pay at $17-$18 which I know is more accurate around here starting out. I'm a EE but work along side the unions on some of the firm's projects.

 

Inside wiremans make 28 w/ license.

 

Outside wireman or lineman make 35 w/ liscence.

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I'm for any system that allows @Megasoup‌ an opportunity to survive. Homeless people with no skills whatsoever, who use the internet need some way to earn a living.

 

My friend, I'm a journeyman carpenter. I also held a license as a Real Estate Broker, opening my own brokerage at the tender age of 26.

 

I tend bar, true, but I'm not like an Applebee's bartender. I'm more like Tom Cruise's character in ****tail.

 

I'm back in St. Louis and I have control of my mind. I was just offered a position as the head bartender at El Paisano's; a chain of restaurants in this area. In addition to revamping our behind-the bar operations at our new location and others, I will also be finishing the construction of an outdoor patio in the Mid-town area, where a lot of special events will be taking place, as well as helping to coordinate the upcoming Salsa events that we will be throwing there. The owner also has an interest in getting opening up coffee bistros, and our plan is for me to design, construct and operate those, as well.

 

You underestimate me. That's okay.

 

 

I didn't underestimate you, I was just telling these guys that you would be here telling us about how **** and job opportunities would be falling in your lap any day now.

 

Let's see a picture of the 10/10 you hooked up with last night.

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

The average Journeyman lineman salary is $28 with the low end being $13 an hour.

 

What's the incentive of going to school as a lineman or some job like that if your average starting salary is the same as the guy that bakes your pizza or flips your burgers with zero education? You have to pay your managers more than your lowest employees so their wages go up too. You could be an assistant manager at Pizza Hut making $35k a year with no education and only a couple of years of experience or you could pay $20,000 for school, and then work in ****ty weather for 5-10 years making $17 an hour before you get enough experience to move up and make good money. No Journeyman lineman is making 13. That's apprentice wages (maybe that's what you meant)

 

 

I got those stats online but I thought it was quite low as well. A few sites had different wages. A few others had starting pay at $17-$18 which I know is more accurate around here starting out. I'm a EE but work along side the unions on some of the firm's projects.

 

Inside wiremans make 28 w/ license.

 

Outside wireman or lineman make 35 w/ liscence.

 

That sounds right but it depends on geography and the company. This website seems more accurate than what I found earlier.

 

http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Journeyman_Lineman/Hourly_Rate

 

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When one runs a business, there are a lot of expenses besides labor. There is the cost of rent or mortgage, the cost of utilities, licenses, equipment, insurance; those things are the minimum. Now depending on the business, there are a lot of other things involved, as well. If you're some sort of manufacturing, you gotta take into account raw materials, shipping and all kinds of other stuff. Some industries have an need to advertise their goods and services, which is very costly. Other industries, well...they require other things.

 

The point is, labor is often a small percentage of the cost of doing business. If labor is 20% (which is a high number, but a nice, round one for this example) and everyone (not just the minimum wage employees; which is also a way of boosting this up so you get the point) gets a 20% raise...and all the other fixed expenses stay at or near the same price (which makes sense. Why would Real Estate or utilities cost more, all of a sudden? There are no minimum wage employees in any of those industries) then the price would only need to be boosted 4% to cover the difference in the cost of labor.

 

Each industry is different. Labor is normally the highest expense for restaurants. The reason utilities and everything will rise is because normally if the minimum wage raises then everyone's wage gets a small bump eventually. You can't pay your untility worker with a college degree close to the same amount of money as a fast food worker with little to no education.

 

Why can't you pay a utility worker the same amount of money?

The average Journeyman lineman salary is $28 with the low end being $13 an hour.

 

What's the incentive of going to school as a lineman or some job like that if your average starting salary is the same as the guy that bakes your pizza or flips your burgers with zero education? You have to pay your managers more than your lowest employees so their wages go up too. You could be an assistant manager at Pizza Hut making $35k a year with no education and only a couple of years of experience or you could pay $20,000 for school, and then work in ****ty weather for 5-10 years making $17 an hour before you get enough experience to move up and make good money. No Journeyman lineman is making 13. That's apprentice wages (maybe that's what you meant)

 

 

I got those stats online but I thought it was quite low as well. A few sites had different wages. A few others had starting pay at $17-$18 which I know is more accurate around here starting out. I'm a EE but work along side the unions on some of the firm's projects.

 

Inside wiremans make 28 w/ license.

 

Outside wireman or lineman make 35 w/ liscence.

 

That sounds right but it depends on geography and the company. This website seems more accurate than what I found earlier.

 

http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Journeyman_Lineman/Hourly_Rate

yup, I'm not even positive the figures I gave are accurate. I've just been told those figures by a handful of workers that have traveled all over the nation, you may be closer.

 

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LoL When I worked for minimum wage as a teenager I got paid $5.15 a hour and I'm only 28 years old. Are there others on here that worked for an even lower minimum wage?

 

I used to make $3.15 an hour (plus tips, which were fat... but still) at a restaurant when I was 17. Minimum wage was like $5.35 an hour. And that was only 12 years ago. lol

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**** this im moving to seattle and getting a job at mcdonalds

 

 

Please do, that's only a five hour drive from me, I'll take a weekend trip out there to leave an upper decker for you to deal with.

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So, this seems like an ego issue with some people?

 

Has nothing to do with ego personally. Yes it's disheartening that I spent 4 years on an education that virtually pays the same as their minimum wage but such a drastic increase overnight like this won't end well. I will be rooting for it to fail tbh so other states don't follow suit. The layoffs alone are reason enough for me to protest this. How many businesses, smaller businesses in particular will have to lay off employees to make up for the wage increase. I owned a small business a couple years back and only had one employee and broke even every month until I was forced to close 9 months later.

 

Their is very little upside to this. And for people that do get laid off will have a harder time finding work because everybody will sit on their jobs now that their getting paid management money. Unless this is temporary for some kind of stimulant for Seattle, this is a bad news.

 

Sorry, but I can't help be read ego problem all over your reply. Rooting for it to fail is weak IMO, better to root for it to work, across the board.

 

Read the article, this isn't an overnight thing.

 

I don't even understand what ego has to do with it. I would feel the same with or without an education. I just don't see how the upside outweighs the obvious flaws with this system.

 

I'm just saying, the way it reads to me is that you seem pissed because you think that education automatically should equal higher pay.

 

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