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At what point are you not an athlete


SavageTC

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A thread a while back asked a question whether or not drivers in motorsports are athletes. Of course opinion was split but it got me thinking, there are countless sports out there but not all of their participants could be called athletes, and what really is an athlete anyway?

Anyone who competes at the Olympics is called an Olympic athlete so obviously all Olympic sports are athletic right?. Obviously any sport that falls under the umbrella of athletics right, track and field, cross country and... racewalking. Then you have swimming, diving, water polo and ... synchronised swimming. The list goes on gymnastics, weighlifting, boxing judo and fencing.... Equestrian, golf, sailing and shooting.

 

So what makes someone an athlete. Is it physical fitness, being really good at something or a combination of both?

 

 

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Merriam-Webster may shead some light on the confusion >

the word athlete originally translated from both Latin and Greek means to contend for a prize -

 

Another translation from Greek is one who participates.

 

In the oxford dictionary its defined as "A person who is proficient in sports and other forms of physical exercise".

 

http://college.usatoday.com/2014/06/26/college-to-grant-league-of-legends-players-varsity-athletic-scholarships/

 

So an athlete is anyone who does anything pretty much right?.

 

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Merriam-Webster may shead some light on the confusion >

the word athlete originally translated from both Latin and Greek means to contend for a prize -

 

Another translation from Greek is one who participates.

 

In the oxford dictionary its defined as "A person who is proficient in sports and other forms of physical exercise".

 

http://college.usatoday.com/2014/06/26/college-to-grant-league-of-legends-players-varsity-athletic-scholarships/

 

So an athlete is anyone who does anything pretty much right?.

 

obviously open to individual interpretation, a billiard player may compete for a prize

but not necessarily be proficient in any form of physical exercise ... hence Minnesota Fats -

 

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The question you've asked is "At what point are you not an athlete?" To determine that, first one must first define what an athlete is. I agree that this is up to interpretation.

 

In my opinion, an athlete must be an adult. While soccer, football or basketball are damn fine sports, a child who plays these sports is not an athlete. Some teens are exceptional, so that would make them exceptions. But, by and large, an amateur boxer in Jr. High is not yet an athlete.

 

The sport one engages in must be the type of activity that causes one to break a sweat or fatigue. So by this measurement, even a high-level player of billiards or baseball is not an athlete. Those are skills, not sports (I don't care how they're defined in the Dictionary.) That's not to say that they couldn't still be an athlete. Their individual performances in the gym or on the track may very well prove them to be an athlete, but that would be the result of that very same work that they put in the gym, not the sport that they compete in. For that matter, a soldier can be an athlete...provided they're athletic.

 

The point in which an athlete ceases to be an athlete if they cannot compete at a collegiate level or accomplish feats of athleticism far beyond the "average" male. There is a science and there are "averages."

 

Can't run a mile in under 7 minutes? (an easy thing to do.) You're not an athlete. Can't bench press your body weight for reps? You're not an athlete.

 

Can't do ten pull-ups? You're not an athlete. (Recently, the top draft pick for NHL could not perform even a single rep. It made headlines. This is a crazy world and there are always exceptions. I will say that there are very few hockey players in this world, comparative to the number of basketball players and soccer players. It's a very small pool to draw from. Not everyone is a rich, spoiled brat whose parents can afford a bunch of equipment and the cost of ice time, nor dote over their children and give them rides to and from practice every day. These "athletes" are in a category of their own and have no fear of having to compete against a hungry black competitor from the projects or a "die before they quit" farm boy from a small, rural town. They shouldn't be compared to the world's greats in real sports.)

 

When do you cease to be an athlete? When you are wimpy average.

 

 

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Merriam-Webster may shead some light on the confusion >

the word athlete originally translated from both Latin and Greek means to contend for a prize -

 

Another translation from Greek is one who participates.

 

In the oxford dictionary its defined as "A person who is proficient in sports and other forms of physical exercise".

 

http://college.usatoday.com/2014/06/26/college-to-grant-league-of-legends-players-varsity-athletic-scholarships/

 

So an athlete is anyone who does anything pretty much right?.

 

obviously open to individual interpretation, a billiard player may compete for a prize

but not necessarily be proficient in any form of physical exercise ... hence Minnesota Fats -

 

If you don't break a sweat, it's not a sport.

 

An athlete is someone that is generally good at everything physical

 

I always looked at it as a person that has high level physical fitness attributes & capabilities.

 

I never really looked at say jet pilots, race car drivers etc. as athletes although you do have to be physically fit just because it's tough on the body.

 

 

once you stop lifting

 

These are all good answers.

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I always just viewed athletes as someone who excels at physical sports, different than someone who just "plays", football, soccer, tennis, wrestle, on and on. To me physical sports requires better than normal strength and endurance in whatever attribute the sport calls for.

 

My mind gets split when you bring up things like sumo and WWE type wrestling. I'm not sure that I consider those people athletes in those roles.

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I always just viewed athletes as someone who excels at physical sports, different than someone who just "plays", football, soccer, tennis, wrestle, on and on. To me physical sports requires better than normal strength and endurance in whatever attribute the sport calls for.

 

My mind gets split when you bring up things like sumo and WWE type wrestling. I'm not sure that I consider those people athletes in those roles.

 

I would say WWE wrestlers are athletes due to the fact that many of them are very capable of doing many other sports, they are in great shape and need "athletic ability" to do what they do for a living.

 

Professional poker players and chess players sometimes refer to themselves as athletes because the mental exhaustion and stress they put on their body's, there is no doubt the better shape you are in the longer you can focus and think clearer but does that make an athlete?

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The question you've asked is "At what point are you not an athlete?" To determine that, first one must first define what an athlete is. I agree that this is up to interpretation.

 

In my opinion, an athlete must be an adult. While soccer, football or basketball are damn fine sports, a child who plays these sports is not an athlete. Some teens are exceptional, so that would make them exceptions. But, by and large, an amateur boxer in Jr. High is not yet an athlete.

 

The sport one engages in must be the type of activity that causes one to break a sweat or fatigue. So by this measurement, even a high-level player of billiards or baseball is not an athlete. Those are skills, not sports (I don't care how they're defined in the Dictionary.) That's not to say that they couldn't still be an athlete. Their individual performances in the gym or on the track may very well prove them to be an athlete, but that would be the result of that very same work that they put in the gym, not the sport that they compete in. For that matter, a soldier can be an athlete...provided they're athletic.

 

The point in which an athlete ceases to be an athlete if they cannot compete at a collegiate level or accomplish feats of athleticism far beyond the "average" male. There is a science and there are "averages."

 

Can't run a mile in under 7 minutes? (an easy thing to do.) You're not an athlete. Can't bench press your body weight for reps? You're not an athlete.

 

Can't do ten pull-ups? You're not an athlete. (Recently, the top draft pick for NHL could not perform even a single rep. It made headlines. This is a crazy world and there are always exceptions. I will say that there are very few hockey players in this world, comparative to the number of basketball players and soccer players. It's a very small pool to draw from. Not everyone is a rich, spoiled brat whose parents can afford a bunch of equipment and the cost of ice time, nor dote over their children and give them rides to and from practice every day. These "athletes" are in a category of their own and have no fear of having to compete against a hungry black competitor from the projects or a "die before they quit" farm boy from a small, rural town. They shouldn't be compared to the world's greats in real sports.)

 

When do you cease to be an athlete? When you are wimpy average.

 

 

You have some stupid examples here. Your time running a mile, your bench press, and the number of pull ups you can do, have nothing to do with it. Your hockey argument is stupid and falsely stereotypes certain people. "Hungry black competitors" quit just as much and any other athletes. Same with farm boys. Even the best basketball player in the world quit in this year's NBA finals.

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The question you've asked is "At what point are you not an athlete?" To determine that, first one must first define what an athlete is. I agree that this is up to interpretation.

 

In my opinion, an athlete must be an adult. While soccer, football or basketball are damn fine sports, a child who plays these sports is not an athlete. Some teens are exceptional, so that would make them exceptions. But, by and large, an amateur boxer in Jr. High is not yet an athlete.

 

The sport one engages in must be the type of activity that causes one to break a sweat or fatigue. So by this measurement, even a high-level player of billiards or baseball is not an athlete. Those are skills, not sports (I don't care how they're defined in the Dictionary.) That's not to say that they couldn't still be an athlete. Their individual performances in the gym or on the track may very well prove them to be an athlete, but that would be the result of that very same work that they put in the gym, not the sport that they compete in. For that matter, a soldier can be an athlete...provided they're athletic.

 

The point in which an athlete ceases to be an athlete if they cannot compete at a collegiate level or accomplish feats of athleticism far beyond the "average" male. There is a science and there are "averages."

 

Can't run a mile in under 7 minutes? (an easy thing to do.) You're not an athlete. Can't bench press your body weight for reps? You're not an athlete.

 

Can't do ten pull-ups? You're not an athlete. (Recently, the top draft pick for NHL could not perform even a single rep. It made headlines. This is a crazy world and there are always exceptions. I will say that there are very few hockey players in this world, comparative to the number of basketball players and soccer players. It's a very small pool to draw from. Not everyone is a rich, spoiled brat whose parents can afford a bunch of equipment and the cost of ice time, nor dote over their children and give them rides to and from practice every day. These "athletes" are in a category of their own and have no fear of having to compete against a hungry black competitor from the projects or a "die before they quit" farm boy from a small, rural town. They shouldn't be compared to the world's greats in real sports.)

 

When do you cease to be an athlete? When you are wimpy average.

 

 

You have some stupid examples here. Your time running a mile, your bench press, and the number of pull ups you can do, have nothing to do with it. Your hockey argument is stupid and falsely stereotypes certain people. "Hungry black competitors" quit just as much and any other athletes. Same with farm boys. Even the best basketball player in the world quit in this year's NBA finals.

 

@classicboxer‌

I'm surprised that you feel this way. Any decent boxer would blow through ten pullups, sub-seven minute miles and a challenge of bench pressing their own bodyweight, as those athletes (us, assuming you were also someone who once boxed competitively) take conditioning very seriously, knowing it's essential to being the best they can be.

 

I also don't understand how you are such an opponent to my posting, considering that we share the sport of boxing.

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The question you've asked is "At what point are you not an athlete?" To determine that, first one must first define what an athlete is. I agree that this is up to interpretation.

 

In my opinion, an athlete must be an adult. While soccer, football or basketball are damn fine sports, a child who plays these sports is not an athlete. Some teens are exceptional, so that would make them exceptions. But, by and large, an amateur boxer in Jr. High is not yet an athlete.

 

The sport one engages in must be the type of activity that causes one to break a sweat or fatigue. So by this measurement, even a high-level player of billiards or baseball is not an athlete. Those are skills, not sports (I don't care how they're defined in the Dictionary.) That's not to say that they couldn't still be an athlete. Their individual performances in the gym or on the track may very well prove them to be an athlete, but that would be the result of that very same work that they put in the gym, not the sport that they compete in. For that matter, a soldier can be an athlete...provided they're athletic.

 

The point in which an athlete ceases to be an athlete if they cannot compete at a collegiate level or accomplish feats of athleticism far beyond the "average" male. There is a science and there are "averages."

 

Can't run a mile in under 7 minutes? (an easy thing to do.) You're not an athlete. Can't bench press your body weight for reps? You're not an athlete.

 

Can't do ten pull-ups? You're not an athlete. (Recently, the top draft pick for NHL could not perform even a single rep. It made headlines. This is a crazy world and there are always exceptions. I will say that there are very few hockey players in this world, comparative to the number of basketball players and soccer players. It's a very small pool to draw from. Not everyone is a rich, spoiled brat whose parents can afford a bunch of equipment and the cost of ice time, nor dote over their children and give them rides to and from practice every day. These "athletes" are in a category of their own and have no fear of having to compete against a hungry black competitor from the projects or a "die before they quit" farm boy from a small, rural town. They shouldn't be compared to the world's greats in real sports.)

 

When do you cease to be an athlete? When you are wimpy average.

 

 

You have some stupid examples here. Your time running a mile, your bench press, and the number of pull ups you can do, have nothing to do with it. Your hockey argument is stupid and falsely stereotypes certain people. "Hungry black competitors" quit just as much and any other athletes. Same with farm boys. Even the best basketball player in the world quit in this year's NBA finals.

 

@classicboxer‌

I'm surprised that you feel this way. Any decent boxer would blow through ten pullups, sub-seven minute miles and a challenge of bench pressing their own bodyweight, as those athletes (us, assuming you were also someone who once boxed competitively) take conditioning very seriously, knowing it's essential to being the best they can be.

 

I also don't understand how you are such an opponent to my posting, considering that we share the sport of boxing.

 

I just don't think the term "athlete" means someone is "special". I only ride a bike, but I consider myself an athlete. There is a huge difference between an athlete and an elite athlete, but being an athlete isn't anything special, in my opinion. I never really boxed competitively, I don't consider backyard boxing real boxing. As for your assumption that I'm purposely opposing your contributions to the forum, consider it more of a "devil's advocate" type of opposition, and all in fun. I thought that's why you put so much into your posts.

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Anyone who thinks competitive swimming is not an athletic sport has never done it. I do it mainly for endurance and increased coordination. You literally exercise every muscle in your body and have to coordinate all of your limbs in a smooth rhythm, otherwise you're slow and lose a lot. Olympic swimmers are some of the most conditioned and athletic people in the world.

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Anyone who thinks competitive swimming is not an athletic sport has never done it. I do it mainly for endurance and increased coordination. You literally exercise every muscle in your body and have to coordinate all of your limbs in a smooth rhythm, otherwise you're slow and lose a lot. Olympic swimmers are some of the most conditioned and athletic people in the world.

 

By this logic, sperm are also athletes. ;))

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Anyone who thinks competitive swimming is not an athletic sport has never done it. I do it mainly for endurance and increased coordination. You literally exercise every muscle in your body and have to coordinate all of your limbs in a smooth rhythm, otherwise you're slow and lose a lot. Olympic swimmers are some of the most conditioned and athletic people in the world.

 

By this logic, sperm are also athletes. ;))

 

The best swimmers are white.

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Anyone who thinks competitive swimming is not an athletic sport has never done it. I do it mainly for endurance and increased coordination. You literally exercise every muscle in your body and have to coordinate all of your limbs in a smooth rhythm, otherwise you're slow and lose a lot. Olympic swimmers are some of the most conditioned and athletic people in the world.

 

Who said competitive swimmers weren't athletes? That's insane.

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