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Apparently Prison gangs are actually a good thing


SavageTC
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FORGET the old-fashioned notions of racist, violent thugs grouping together to pick on the weak. Prison gangs are actually a vital tool for social cohesion.


 



That’s the conclusion of a new study by economics professors M. Garrett Roth and David Skarbek, reported on by the The Wilson Quarterly. Roth and Skarbek argue that prison gangs actually keep violence down by creating a stable environment where an internal economy based on contraband can operate.


 


Fundamentally, the problem is this: most people in prison want to trade in contraband of some sort — the most popular being drugs, alcohol, tobacco and mobile phones — but can’t do so within the formal authority structure.


 


Prison gangs provide an “extralegal” framework of what the authors term “community social responsibility”, helping to enforce agreements in contraband trades and resolve social disputes.


 


“In short, inmates join gangs to promote cooperation and trust, which facilitates illegal contraband markets,” they write. “Prison gangs form to provide extralegal governance in social and economic interactions.”


 


For example, if a member of Gang A purchases drugs on credit from a member of Gang B, then Gang A is responsible for the payment of the debt. “If the individual does not pay, then the drug dealer can appeal to the leaders of Gang A for relief,” write the authors.


 


“The leader, or ‘shot caller’ in prison parlance, will either pay the debt, force his member to pay the debt or work for them (perhaps assaulting an enemy of Gang B), assault the inmate to appease the drug dealer, or hand him over to Gang B to assault him in a controlled manner.”


This kind of system is especially effective when it is easier to determine the trustworthiness of a group rather than the trustworthiness of an individual.


 


“When groups have reputations for taking responsibility for its members’ actions, then two members of different groups who do not know each other can still benefit from trade,” they write. “The CRS provides a way for people to trade widely in the absence of an effective legal system.”


 


The rate of inmate homicides and prison riots in the US has actually been declining since the 1970s, at the same time as gangs have proliferated, the authors argue. They cite figures which show the instance of inmate homicides declined 94 per cent between 1973 and 2003.


 


Their study is based on analysis of California prison populations, which have given rise to some of the world’s most notorious gangs including the Mexican Mafia, Nuestra Familia, and the Aryan Brotherhood.


 


Contrary to popular belief, these racial divisions are less about actual race than ease of identification, the authors argue: “An inmate’s race is the most easily observed characteristic in an all-male environment with standard-issue clothing.”


 


Prison gangs resolve both social and commercial conflicts among inmates. In the study, a white inmate who served eight years in prison explains how in-group policing is practised by gangs.


 


“I knew this guy that ran his mouth a lot, made lots of problems, called people names and stuff,” the inmate said.


 


“He called these Mexican guys a bunch of greasy wetbacks. He’s a loose cannon, he’s going to cause trouble you know what I mean, we work hard to keep that race s**t calm and here is this prick causing trouble, no one wants that so we had to check him. We took him down a peg or two, it came right from the top, the a**hole needs a lesson.”


 


Crucially, prison wardens actually benefit from some level of gang activity — or as the authors put it, “the optimal number of prison gangs from the perspective of the warden is not zero”.


 


“They provide relatively peaceable dispute resolution amongst inmates. Gangs wish to avoid riots and conceal fistfights. Gangs also help allocate scarce prison resources, such as benches and basketball courts, in the face of a shortage of such amenities.”


 


http://www.news.com.au/finance/money/why-prison-gangs-are-actually-a-good-thing/story-e6frfmci-1227257280950


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When all is said and done, there isn't a lot the wardens can offer to keep prisoners in line so if they can self govern with out killing each other then why not?

I think its a pretty huge topic tbh honest, and I can see it from a lot of different angles.

 

Right now I think its pretty crazy, to put it as simply as possible, because it gives the prisoners power. It makes the punishment handed out by the state mean less, gives prisoners who want to genuinely reform less chance, and creates more problems on the outside.

 

I felt like this article was written by Bjjnoob

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I think its a pretty huge topic tbh honest, and I can see it from a lot of different angles.

 

Right now I think its pretty crazy, to put it as simply as possible, because it gives the prisoners power. It makes the punishment handed out by the state mean less, gives prisoners who want to genuinely reform less chance, and creates more problems on the outside.

 

I felt like this article was written by Bjjnoob

Good point there.  I'm not sure that anyone wanting to get involved with the gangs in the first place is really looking to be reformed though.  I suppose it'll make it harder on anyone wanting to lone wolf it through their sentence but those wanting to truly reform would find a way

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Good point there.  I'm not sure that anyone wanting to get involved with the gangs in the first place is really looking to be reformed though.  I suppose it'll make it harder on anyone wanting to lone wolf it through their sentence but those wanting to truly reform would find a way

Sometimes that is the case, there are plenty of people who genuinely want to be gang bangers and be **** people, but there is also a lot of evidence that location, poverty, peer pressure and circumstance play a big role, and gangs target the young and vulnerable.

 

I think people need to ask the question, Why do so many people re offend? If someone goes to gaol for five years for doing something bad, dont we want to make sure we do everything possible so that when that person is released they A. Are a very low risk of re offending and B. that they can be re integrated as a functional member of society.

 

Locking people up in a place where they have a roof over their head, three meals a day, dont have to do a proper job, can get access to pretty much anything they want, with a completely different social hierarchy that is essentially criminal networking is not an efficient system, and is essentially just keeping people off the street till the cycle repeats.

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I was thinking in the current prison environment as it stands.  Prisons in general need to change.  I agree somewhat with what Amunera said above.  They have too much time on their hands and should be made to be productive with their time.  Give them the kind of work that can help them when they're released.  I know some prisons offer training and education but that stuff should be made mandatory for anyone in there not doing whole life sentences.  Don't give them time to form gangs and stuff

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Good time to post this TC, whilst our American cousins are slumbering....hopefully it can last a few hours before mention is made of combs being grabbed etc.

 

I have mixed views on this.  It seems to be an admission of failure.  It's a bit like saying we need bullys at school to beat up the fat kids because we have failed to educate them on nutrition and provide decent exercise.

 

I think overall I'd be in favour of harsher penalties for crimes, but much greater attempts made to rehabilitate and get to the root cause of repeat offenders.  Failing that, let's ship all our criminals to Australia ;-)

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Good time to post this TC, whilst our American cousins are slumbering....hopefully it can last a few hours before mention is made of combs being grabbed etc.

 

I have mixed views on this.  It seems to be an admission of failure.  It's a bit like saying we need bullys at school to beat up the fat kids because we have failed to educate them on nutrition and provide decent exercise.

 

I think overall I'd be in favour of harsher penalties for crimes, but much greater attempts made to rehabilitate and get to the root cause of repeat offenders.  Failing that, let's ship all our criminals to Australia ;-)

lol times his threads so AmeriGOAT's don't hurt his feeling.

 

Grab the comb homie.

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You're much better off not joining a gang, as long as you're not soft and plan on just keeping to yourself.  They'll leave you alone.  You don't want to get into an endless cycle of exchanging favors and you don't want to pick up a "friend" who has your back because you would be expected to have his.  Get a job in the prison to make money for commissary and learn a trade in your free time.  Other than that, read books, stay in your bunk and keep to yourself.  It's not a place to make friends.  

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You're much better off not joining a gang, as long as you're not soft and plan on just keeping to yourself.  They'll leave you alone.  You don't want to get into an endless cycle of exchanging favors and you don't want to pick up a "friend" who has your back because you would be expected to have his.  Get a job in the prison to make money for commissary and learn a trade in your free time.  Other than that, read books, stay in your bunk and keep to yourself.  It's not a place to make friends.

 

LoL you've never done prison time so how would you know?

 

This isn't county fakey McFakester

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I've awaited trial countless times. I've gotten lucky (pardon the pun) each time, but I always nervously waited until my court date, unsure of what my sentence would be. I couldn't help but strike up conversations with the other inmates, couldn't be avoided. I have a fairly good idea how things go on in prison.

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I've awaited trial countless times. I've gotten lucky (pardon the pun) each time, but I always nervously waited until my court date, unsure of what my sentence would be. I couldn't help but strike up conversations with the other inmates, couldn't be avoided. I have a fairly good idea how things go on in prison.

No, you don't know at all as you never done time

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let me clarify

 

there is an escort call girl service specialized in visiting prisons in Holland.

 

a convict has to pay 150 euros an hour and they can only visit during visiting hours.

before the call girl is allowed to visit (for some private time) they had to visit the convict 3 times before (they visit by only registrating themselves by putting their signature on a form and they leave straight away)

 

after they done that they can visit as their "girlfriend" lol

 

prostitution is not forbidden here and the girls are officially working for themselfes and pay tax lol

 

also the prisons know whats up and officially its not allowed that they visit prisons,but they prefer this over men raping each other

Edited by Fred_Flink_Stoned
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Yeah organized crime is way better than loner wolf tactics. You can actually arrest and prosecute the tards as they snitch on each other. Of coarse media would push slave control propaganda opposed to liberating and enlightening INFO. We better just create state gangs and join the United Nations already....

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