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LoL!!! UFC185 Fighters try to pronounce Polish Page's last name


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Polish surnames are just st00pid

 

Nah ;-) They reflect the rich history of Europe, oh - and spelling rules you're not familiar with.

 

The surname "Jędrzejczyk" is derived from the first name Andrzej [English Andrew, Russian Andrei etc.], which originates in the Greek word anér, genetically andrós 'a man' or 'andreios ‘manly’, meaning: manly, brave.  The polonized version of Andreas used to be Jandrzej /yandzhey/ (oldest records date back to the 12th century), which later underwent phonetic evolution and turned into Jędrzej around the 16th century.

 

Jędrzejczyk could losely be translated into "Of Andrew" in English.

Edited by najma
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Nah ;-) They reflect the rich history of Europe, oh - and spelling rules you're not familiar with.

 

The surname "Jędrzejczyk" is derived from the first name Andrzej [English Andrew, Russian Andrei etc.], which originates in the Greek word anér, genetically andrós 'a man' or 'andreios ‘manly’, meaning: manly, brave.  The polonized version of Andreas used to be Jandrzej /yandzhey/ (oldest records date back to the 12th century), which later underwent phonetic evolution and turned into Jędrzej around the 16th century.

 

Jędrzejczyk could losely be translated into "Of Andrew" in English.

Just because they're old rules doesn't mean they shouldn't be changed. So many consonants just overcomplicate things

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Just because they're old rules doesn't mean they shouldn't be changed. So many consonants just overcomplicate things

Which consonants do you mean? Wh-i-ch consonants? Wić ones?

 

Jędrzejczyk

vs.

Yendzheychyk

Edited by najma
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Nah ;-) They reflect the rich history of Europe, oh - and spelling rules you're not familiar with.

 

The surname "Jędrzejczyk" is derived from the first name Andrzej [English Andrew, Russian Andrei etc.], which originates in the Greek word anér, genetically andrós 'a man' or 'andreios ‘manly’, meaning: manly, brave.  The polonized version of Andreas used to be Jandrzej /yandzhey/ (oldest records date back to the 12th century), which later underwent phonetic evolution and turned into Jędrzej around the 16th century.

 

Jędrzejczyk could losely be translated into "Of Andrew" in English.

**** off troll.

 

Someone obviously rolled their face on a keyboard to come up with that name.

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Like using 4 letters for one simple sound (e.g. Kuszczak) but it's a language that no one needs to learn so it's whatever

Those are 2 sounds, fool. sz = sh, cz = ch, which would be Kushchak in English, but most probably something more ridiculous like Kooschack.

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