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Texas teacher implements "no homework" policy


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http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/08/23/texas-teacher-implements-no-homework-policy-internet-rejoices/89194914/
 

A second grade teacher's no-homework policy has gone viral, thanks to a student's mother posting about it on Facebook.

Last week, mom Samantha Gallagher posted a noteon Facebook from her daughter's teacher reading: "After much research this summer, I'm trying something new. Homework will only consist of work that your student did not finish during the school day. There will be no formally assigned homework this year."

Godley Elementary School teacher Brandy Young told parents research doesn't prove homework improves performance. So, she said, time after school is best spent eating dinner as a family, reading together, playing outside and getting children to bed early.

It was a decision Young said she made with the support of her district.

"Our district, campus, and teaching teams are exactly the supportive environment you need if you're going to break the mold and try something new," Young said in an email. "We're never really afraid to voice new opinions and ideas because our leadership is always so supportive, and our co-workers want what's best for educating our students."

Gallagher said her daughter is "loving her new teacher already!" The post has more than 67,400 shares on Facebook and started a healthy conversation on Reddit: I wish this was the homework policy when I was in school.

The response has been overwhelmingly "supportive and positive," Gallagher said. "Many who have responded are educators themselves wanting info from Mrs. Young on how to go about implementing the policy themselves."

Hosburgh said her daughter had about an hour of homework each night in first grade.

“We plan on spending more time as a family unwinding and catching up in the evenings,” she said. “Also Brooke is interested in gymnastics and this will allow more time for that.”

The National PTA and the National Education Association recommends the maximum amount of homework (all subjects combined) should be 10 minutes or less per grade level per night. So, second grade students should have 20 minutes of homework per night.

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She's a second grade school teacher, but I think she's on to something here.
     
I know my school career took a dip when I got to 7th grade. First experience with seven different classes a day, and all but gym assigning homework. I had a long bus ride home and then had to wait for my mom to come get me. I didn't take school very seriously for a long time. 
   
Then one day in junior year (11th grade), my "guidance counselor" calls me down to her office. I put quotes around "guidance counselor" because I'd never seen this **** before in my life. She proceeds to tell me that I got a 28 on my ACT, and asks why my grades aren't better. I look at her like she's retarded because I didn't know the grading scale on the ACT, and obviously thought 28/100 is terrible. She had to explain to me that it wasn't at all. She was then looking at me like I was retarded because I got a better score than 90% of the school will and I didn't care about school.
   
My mom actually recently told me a story about one of my sixth grade teachers telling her that they had trouble with getting me to do my homework, but unlike the rest of the students' parents, he didn't want to her to bother with yelling at me or punishing me. He said that when I took the tests, I always got really good grades. So the info was in my head, whether I did the "busy" work or not.
   
I've talked to quite a few people who always did very well on testing, but awful in school, and they all had the same issues. My buddy was an army ranger and got a 92 on his ASVAB test, but squeaked by in high school. He's got a seven year old and we've had this homework talk a couple times. His son is bringing home work nightly already, and doesn't want to do it. 
 
I think some students would benefit from this type of teacher. Whereas others kind of need it pounded into their heads.

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I think they should put some time in because they got it easy these days.  I'm not even old but principals could actually bust your **** when I was in elementary school.

 

If that happened now it would be lawsuits and a jail time.

 

American children are ****ing soft as **** now.  Our future as the Alpha's of the world is not good.

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I think they should put some time in because they got it easy these days.  I'm not even old but principals could actually bust your **** when I was in elementary school.

 

If that happened now it would be lawsuits and a jail time.

 

American children are ****ing soft as **** now.  Our future as the Alpha's of the world is not good.

That's true. But the Pussification of America is a totally different topic.

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Not completely. Teachers too pussified to hand out homework because it might cut into Pokemon Go time and half of these idiots have their parents doing the **** for them anyway... so **** it.

Lol there have been loads of studies done and there doesn't appear to be any huge benefit on learning. What I do think it provides is an established routine and makes them think about learning.

 

Personally I'm on the fence. I set homework to my classes weekly because it is part of my policy. Thankfully kids do the homework I set because otherwise they are in detention. There are a number of issues I have with homework though. Realistically the 'bad' kids will do it if they respect you enough, but you cannot force them to put in effort so they don't necessarily get a lot from it. The awesome kids will do it with lots of effort, but it does eat into time they could explore their interests and somewhat limits their learning.

 

I don't necessarily think this no homework policy is a terrible idea.

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Lol there have been loads of studies done and there doesn't appear to be any huge benefit on learning. What I do think it provides is an established routine and makes them think about learning.

 

Personally I'm on the fence. I set homework to my classes weekly because it is part of my policy. Thankfully kids do the homework I set because otherwise they are in detention. There are a number of issues I have with homework though. Realistically the 'bad' kids will do it if they respect you enough, but you cannot force them to put in effort so they don't necessarily get a lot from it. The awesome kids will do it with lots of effort, but it does eat into time they could explore their interests and somewhat limits their learning.

 

I don't necessarily think this no homework policy is a terrible idea.

You just inadvertently called me an "awesome" student. Thanks buddy.

 

All I really needed was the teacher to go over it one time on the chalkboard/overhead projector. That's it. I didn't need nineteen pages of the same problems over and over. I didn't need to reread some chapter of a book with the exact same info, just so I could write out two pages of answers for the word problems based on the classwork I just did.

 

It was monotonous and made school exhausting. It took me a couple hours to just get into my house at night from leaving school. I got to school between 7:30 and 8:15 every morning. So I had barely any time to just sit and clear my head as a child. Once it got to the point where I was doing homework right up until I went to bed, and then still having to try to rush and finish it in the morning, I was done. Then I've got a bad relationship with a teacher that would have otherwise liked me, because I absorb the info, but I just don't have the time, nor the energy, to waste on homework.

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You just inadvertently called me an "awesome" student. Thanks buddy.

 

All I really needed was the teacher to go over it one time on the chalkboard/overhead projector. That's it. I didn't need nineteen pages of the same problems over and over. I didn't need to reread some chapter of a book with the exact same info, just so I could write out two pages of answers for the word problems based on the classwork I just did.

 

It was monotonous and made school exhausting. It took me a couple hours to just get into my house at night from leaving school. I got to school between 7:30 and 8:15 every morning. So I had barely any time to just sit and clear my head as a child. Once it got to the point where I was doing homework right up until I went to bed, and then still having to try to rush and finish it in the morning, I was done. Then I've got a bad relationship with a teacher that would have otherwise liked me, because I absorb the info, but I just don't have the time, nor the energy, to waste on homework.

I understand bro. I honestly think the problem is that we do (or us good teachers do) loads of work on trying to personalise learning during lessons.....but it's impossible to do that with homework. So kids who learn differently are given the same thing to do and it can end up driving them nuts.

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I understand bro. I honestly think the problem is that we do (or us good teachers do) loads of work on trying to personalise learning during lessons.....but it's impossible to do that with homework. So kids who learn differently are given the same thing to do and it can end up driving them nuts.

I know it's not practical for every single teacher, but I always think back to my sixth grade math teacher. By no means was I any better of a student for her than I was any of the other teachers. I'm sure I was a jack***, and I probably didn't do much homework. But nonetheless, she had me doing algebra in sixth grade while the other kids were pounding the same topics over and over. She had an entirely different lesson plan for myself, and two other students in the grade. She would send us to another room. She'd stand there for five minutes and explain the topic, give us the work, and leave.

    

I was interested in school again. It was new. It was things that I'd never learned before. I felt freedom in my classroom. If I spoke to the kid next to me, nobody freaked out. Nobody claimed I was disrupting some other dunce's education.

  

The only issue it created for me is that I went most of seventh and eighth grade algebra and geometry doing the same stuff I'd done in sixth grade. So it got very tiring doing pages and pages of the same ol' stuff. Made me feel very stagnant.

  

The smart kids do their homework in their spare time at school. They finish it before school's out.

In the 1950's maybe.

  

Not nowadays when teachers purposely give you as much work as they can to take up all of your school time, and then give you work as you're leaving to ensure that it is indeed "homework".

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I know it's not practical for every single teacher, but I always think back to my sixth grade math teacher. By no means was I any better of a student for her than I was any of the other teachers. I'm sure I was a jack***, and I probably didn't do much homework. But nonetheless, she had me doing algebra in sixth grade while the other kids were pounding the same topics over and over. She had an entirely different lesson plan for myself, and two other students in the grade. She would send us to another room. She'd stand there for five minutes and explain the topic, give us the work, and leave.

    

I was interested in school again. It was new. It was things that I'd never learned before. I felt freedom in my classroom. If I spoke to the kid next to me, nobody freaked out. Nobody claimed I was disrupting some other dunce's education.

  

The only issue it created for me is that I went most of seventh and eighth grade algebra and geometry doing the same stuff I'd done in sixth grade. So it got very tiring doing pages and pages of the same ol' stuff. Made me feel very stagnant.

  

In the 1950's maybe.

  

Not nowadays when teachers purposely give you as much work as they can to take up all of your school time, and then give you work as you're leaving to ensure that it is indeed "homework".

 

How old are you? 14?

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I know it's not practical for every single teacher, but I always think back to my sixth grade math teacher. By no means was I any better of a student for her than I was any of the other teachers. I'm sure I was a jack***, and I probably didn't do much homework. But nonetheless, she had me doing algebra in sixth grade while the other kids were pounding the same topics over and over. She had an entirely different lesson plan for myself, and two other students in the grade. She would send us to another room. She'd stand there for five minutes and explain the topic, give us the work, and leave.

 

I was interested in school again. It was new. It was things that I'd never learned before. I felt freedom in my classroom. If I spoke to the kid next to me, nobody freaked out. Nobody claimed I was disrupting some other dunce's education.

 

The only issue it created for me is that I went most of seventh and eighth grade algebra and geometry doing the same stuff I'd done in sixth grade. So it got very tiring doing pages and pages of the same ol' stuff. Made me feel very stagnant.

 

In the 1950's maybe.

 

Not nowadays when teachers purposely give you as much work as they can to take up all of your school time, and then give you work as you're leaving to ensure that it is indeed "homework".

Techniques like this are good. Thankfully I only teach setted classes of similar ability. I think the American/English education system are quite different so some things don't merge across well. Either way with this story it's just nice to see teachers try different things.

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So is waking up in the morning

 

?? did not get that.

 

What i meant in my original post with at all levels included parental as well, that is what I was tryng to say, and not only parental but college education needs to change as does the post graduate education :)

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I never did homework that didn't count for a significant portion of my grades, I was a C student for nearly the entirety of my academic "career" with the exception of needing an honor roll report card for my parents to buy me a Nintendo and then again for an SNES.

 

All through High School I scored a 90% or better on all mid terms and finals but never once did basic nightly homework.

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My wife taught(retired at 35, WTF!) 10th and 12th grade. Instead of homework she assigned one project for the first half of the year and one project for the second half of the year. The first one was always a solo project and the second was always a group project. She would allow the students to pick their group. She says she loved doing it this way since the kids could learn responsibility and dictate their own schedule. Kinda prep for college or the real world as she puts it. She liked having kids pick their own groups too. They had the first half of the year to get to know each other and the second half to pick the right team to work with.

School has to be adaptive to the real world. Doing homework every night isn't relevant to the real world. Some people bring work home but not every night, unless your a teacher(tons of papers to grade everynight).

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I never did homework in high school. Our school was very athlete friendly. I got an A in Physics 1 & 2. I litreally filled in A & B on both finals and ended up with A's on both. You would think we were football players or basketball players, but nope. We were a wrestling school, crazy.

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I never did homework in high school. Our school was very athlete friendly. I got an A in Physics 1 & 2. I litreally filled in A & B on both finals and ended up with A's on both. You would think we were football players or basketball players, but nope. We were a wrestling school, crazy.

I had awful grades in high school, until they tried to kick me out for attendance. lol.. Then I got it together, and got nothing lower than a B.

  

I was too stupid to comprehend the right college route could make my life way easier, but not too stupid to know that I had to have my high school diploma. Too bad my "guidance counselor" only gave a **** about me after my ACT in the middle of junior year. I could've probably used somebody to get my head focused on the future. My parents were lost in their own worlds. 

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I had awful grades in high school, until they tried to kick me out for attendance. lol.. Then I got it together, and got nothing lower than a B.

 

I was too stupid to comprehend the right college route could make my life way easier, but not too stupid to know that I had to have my high school diploma. Too bad my "guidance counselor" only gave a **** about me after my ACT in the middle of junior year. I could've probably used somebody to get my head focused on the future. My parents were lost in their own worlds.

Maybe, college isn't all its cracked up to be. Tons of people getting the same degree fighting for the same job. If your profession requires it then so be it but alot of it is just to experience college. I dropped out with one year left. I was just done. I partied for 4 years and got through 3 years worth of school. I had an epic time but I took an opportunity to work and rolled with it. Alot of people I went to college with are stuck at the glass ceiling. It was crazy at first because I was making more in costruction then my buddy with a masters. I may have worked physically harder then they did but my rewards were alot greater. Use the no college degree as fuel for the future, run your own stuff. Then a degree is nothing but a picture on the wall.

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Maybe, college isn't all its cracked up to be. Tons of people getting the same degree fighting for the same job. If your profession requires it then so be it but alot of it is just to experience college. I dropped out with one year left. I was just done. I partied for 4 years and got through 3 years worth of school. I had an epic time but I took an opportunity to work and rolled with it. Alot of people I went to college with are stuck at the glass ceiling. It was crazy at first because I was making more in costruction then my buddy with a masters. I may have worked physically harder then they did but my rewards were alot greater. Use the no college degree as fuel for the future, run your own stuff. Then a degree is nothing but a picture on the wall.

I have a better paying job than most of my friends with four year degrees. One of my buddies went to college for the most useless major. Owed a ridiculous amount of money afterwards. Now he has a degree from a decent school, and works at a gas station. lol.. There's nothing around here hiring in his field. 

 

Another friend of mine went off to college, and dropped out to take a job in the laborer's union. He swears up and down it was the best choice he ever made.

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I have a better paying job than most of my friends with four year degrees. One of my buddies went to college for the most useless major. Owed a ridiculous amount of money afterwards. Now he has a degree from a decent school, and works at a gas station. lol.. There's nothing around here hiring in his field.

 

Another friend of mine went off to college, and dropped out to take a job in the laborer's union. He swears up and down it was the best choice he ever made.

Exactly!! Funny thing is I'll still push college on my girls.

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Without reading through all of this, here's my thoughts.  If someone is a trained professional in the art of instruction and they have someone else's undivided attention for 8 hours a day...and they can't teach them...if the students don't have a very strong grasp of what the instructor is showing them...then that instructor is a failure and should find some other profession.

 

Ask yourselves a question.  If you had instruction for several hours a day on subjects that every non retarded person in this country understands, wouldn't you expect to have a complete and thorough understanding?   My experience with public schools has shown me that a striking and vast majority of teachers completely suck at what they do.

 

*Edit.  This 2nd grade teacher is on to something and I agree with her.  

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The smart kids do their homework in their spare time at school. They finish it before school's out.

Spare time? What school did you go to?

 

When I was in school you did work with the teacher/out of your book for the whole class until five minutes before it was time to go. Then they told you what your homework was. Then I had 3 minutes to get to my next class where we started by turning in your homework from the previous day first thing, started working on more stuff in class until five minutes before, then more homework from that class, rinse.

 

When did you have spare time in school? In my high school we were allowed a study hall ONE time for our entire high school learning. That's one study hall in four years time and you got no credits for it. I had work in class and homework times the number of classes I had. It wasn't uncommon for me to spend 1-2 hours on homework each day. Sometimes more if it was for a big report or something. I think 30 minutes was the smallest amount we ever got. It was retarded.

 

In my school, the smart kids got AP classes and hated their lives. The really smart kids played dumb, got their minimal credits for their core classes, then picked easy stuff to coast the rest of the way.

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Many people learn better from practice so homework has it's place. There are also a lot of distractions in class rooms so it can benefit kids to learn at home. I think the amount of homework should limited though. The math teachers that assigned 50 questions to answer or the history teachers that wanted the kids to read 50 pages in a night were ridiculous. I had one math teacher that would give us homework but it wouldn't be a lot. He would assign like 10-15 problems that we needed to hand in and then it would have quite a few more that you could do if you wanted. I'm sure most didn't ever do them but at least it was an option for the ones that struggled to learn or wanted to.

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I almost never did homework. I was honor roll in elementary which was a nice school but when i got middle school it was literally like one of those movies where some young white lady has to go in and reach the kids. It was really bad. Fights every day, bullies, tons of drama and young ladies constantly being messy. Teachers that just didn't give a **** because the kids some of them nearly adults didn't either. My grades suffered pretty rapidly and i barely made it through during those yrs. I didn't start doing well again until i got to high school which wasn't nearly as bad of a school. Even then i was only a B to C level student in most subjects partially out of laziness, not wanting to study & realizing a lot of the real world was very different from what i was learning in school. 

The smart kids do their homework in their spare time at school. They finish it before school's out.

I noticed all the Asian kids had this habit. No wonder they kick so much ****. 

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She's a second grade school teacher, but I think she's on to something here.

 

I know my school career took a dip when I got to 7th grade. First experience with seven different classes a day, and all but gym assigning homework. I had a long bus ride home and then had to wait for my mom to come get me. I didn't take school very seriously for a long time.

 

Then one day in junior year (11th grade), my "guidance counselor" calls me down to her office. I put quotes around "guidance counselor" because I'd never seen this **** before in my life. She proceeds to tell me that I got a 28 on my ACT, and asks why my grades aren't better. I look at her like she's retarded because I didn't know the grading scale on the ACT, and obviously thought 28/100 is terrible. She had to explain to me that it wasn't at all. She was then looking at me like I was retarded because I got a better score than 90% of the school will and I didn't care about school.

 

My mom actually recently told me a story about one of my sixth grade teachers telling her that they had trouble with getting me to do my homework, but unlike the rest of the students' parents, he didn't want to her to bother with yelling at me or punishing me. He said that when I took the tests, I always got really good grades. So the info was in my head, whether I did the "busy" work or not.

 

I've talked to quite a few people who always did very well on testing, but awful in school, and they all had the same issues. My buddy was an army ranger and got a 92 on his ASVAB test, but squeaked by in high school. He's got a seven year old and we've had this homework talk a couple times. His son is bringing home work nightly already, and doesn't want to do it.

 

I think some students would benefit from this type of teacher. Whereas others kind of need it pounded into their heads.

Cool story mate. I was a similar child but with average grades. Kind of clicked for me with just a few classes I really enjoyed.

 

Still took me some 10 years to figure what I really wanted to do.

 

I feel young adults make lifelong decision before they've experienced the world.

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Cashfl0w is 100% right. I had a very similar experience as him in school and homework for the most part (as well as class itself) was a complete and utter waste of my ****ing time. I was saying the same stuff this teacher is all through grade school and high school. Finally someone in authority is figuring this **** out. College was a better experience for me. Most days I was only in class for half a day or so and the studying of the material for the tests was on me. Actual "homework" assignments for most my college classes, if we had them, were not especially time consuming and for the most part did specifically gear you towards passing that test. During college I actually had free time and was learning more quantity and quality in less time than in HS or grade school, all due to the lack of busy work.

 

I actually have a memory of a time, I think in 3rd grade, when we were given some classwork to do, like math problems or something. I finished them very quickly. I then let the teacher know I was done, thinking I would get to go the playground or get to read a book I wanted. Instead she immediately gave me more problems of the exact same type I had just done. That was the moment in my life when I said "**** this stupid bull ****." I never had the option of not doing homework, but the rest of my school career I did the bare minimum necessary to pass classes. Because I'm a ridiculously lazy person, and nothing encourages my laziness more than non-laziness resulting in MORE work for me.

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I learned that we're all pretty similar in this thread. I always knew that was a large population of us. I remembered the other goof offs in school that would still get good grades on the tests, despite throwing paper balls back and forth with me while the teacher was talking.
  
It's amazing that more teachers haven't gotten this principle yet. Society would never approve of it (mainly because PC America would freak out), but the kids who don't get it in the classroom should be given homework. Some of them more than others. The kids who understand the lesson plan shouldn't need a part time job doing paperwork to prove that they absorbed it. I don't know how you could determine that. Maybe a test at the beginning of the school year, or maybe at some point in elementary school. You would probably need an entirely different school just to keep whiny parents at bay.

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