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Some improvements are needed.


CigarMelon

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Let me first say that I love MMA - especially the UFC. I do watch other organizations, but if I want to watch the best guys, chances are I will watch them in the UFC. That being said, the UFC is realistically a young business, and because of this, improvements are needed. Obviously I have NO idea what goes on behind the scenes, and behind closed doors, but here are some things I think the UFC needs to work on.

 

1) Contracts - I put this in here specifically targeting the champions. There has been a lot of talk about champions defending their belt in a suitable amount of time. BJ heard it, now Anderson is hearing it. From what I see, there is nothing in the contract stating that if you are champion you MUST defend your title at least every second fight. This still allows the fighter to explore other options (weight classes), but also keeps his obligation as champion into focus.

 

2) Less PPV's - IMO there are too many PPV's. Don't get me wrong, I love watching the PPV's and I can never wait for the next one coming (ask my wife). I think with less PPV's, we will start seeing better cards in place, however. What to do with all the fighters out there? Fight Nights are a great idea, and it still promotes the UFC the way they are intending to promote it (mass viewing by mass audiences). Also, the UFC has a new TV deal in place for 2010.

 

3) The judges - now this IS obvious, but nonetheless, is desperately needed. Dana knows it, the fans know it, the fighters know it, but unfortunetly the AC's are pulling an ego trip HAVING to control all fights happening in their respective states. This is fine, but to apply the same rules is rediculous. Wouldn't it be great to have retired fighters as judges???? Royce, Liddel, Randy...when they retire that is.

 

I know there are many opinions out there, and I look forward to hearing them. Thoughts???

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I agree with the Judges part. Some guys just look at postion, and strikes. MMA Judges are rare, but you can tell who isnt. A perfect example for both sides would be:

 

Bad) Stevenson v Diaz... All about position really.

Good) Sanchez v Guida... Sanchez worked harder off of his back, and the judges recognized that.

 

I dont really agree with retired fighters judging, could be biast at times, but we definately need to educate for more MMA judges. Not just guys that judge more boxing and stuff (Cecil Peoples... I dont like him).

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They should go to fight day weigh-ins in order to get these fighters into the weight divisions they are supposed to be in.

 

At the moment you have guys fighting a full division above what they weigh in at the day before.

 

I don't quite know about fight day weigh-ins, but this is definetly an area the UFC needs to address IMO - overweight fighters like AS, Thiago, AJ...

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They should go to fight day weigh-ins in order to get these fighters into the weight divisions they are supposed to be in.

 

At the moment you have guys fighting a full division above what they weigh in at the day before.

 

This would create gassed fighters. Thats why the athaletic commisions changed the rules. Guys would be to depleted of energy to compete, and fight effectively.

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the UFC is realistically a young business

 

... this is very true & the odds-makers, casino's, & general-public are consistantly wrong when they install favorites & underdogs as opposed to boxing where the odds-on fighter wins 4/5 .. mma has that "unpredictabe" quality .

As for the PPV aspect, Strikeforce now has the challenger series + network events which are basically free, the UFC should attempt to counter this ... & with the advent of,

Brock

Wanderlei

Spider

Machida

Almeida

Henderson

Rampage

.................... all being a bit invisible now, the UFC fans should get some quality freebies, & as my bud gtp keeps reminding me, "Rogerio vs Banha" is not official for # 106

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To add to this thread...

 

4) Back of head punches - too many great fighters were upset in big fights because of punches thrown to the back of their heads (GSP v Serra 1, and Couture v Lesner). Both punches landed behind the ear, causing a loss of balance and voluntary movement (as these behaviors are located in the cerebellum which is located behind the ears). Because of this, the fighters were cheated from a possible win, and fans were cheated from watching huge matches. This area definetly needs more definition, and proper officiating. If they are looking at eye gauges after the fact, they should definetly look at this after the fact.

 

More feedback is needed...

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This would create gassed fighters. Thats why the athaletic commisions changed the rules. Guys would be to depleted of energy to compete' date=' and fight effectively.[/quote']

 

So they could either fight at the proper weight or be "gassed" for the fight.

 

Up to them.

 

The idea os to enforce the rule, rather than enable the cheating.

 

I don't expect the UFC has any intention of enforcing the rule.

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Let me first say that I love MMA - especially the UFC. I do watch other organizations' date=' but if I want to watch the best guys, chances are I will watch them in the UFC. That being said, the UFC is realistically a young business, and because of this, improvements are needed. Obviously I have NO idea what goes on behind the scenes, and behind closed doors, but here are some things I think the UFC needs to work on.

 

1) Contracts - I put this in here specifically targeting the champions. There has been a lot of talk about champions defending their belt in a suitable amount of time. BJ heard it, now Anderson is hearing it. From what I see, there is nothing in the contract stating that if you are champion you MUST defend your title at least every second fight. This still allows the fighter to explore other options (weight classes), but also keeps his obligation as champion into focus.[/quote']

The problem we have is not so much with the Champions themselves, but with the UFC matchmaking and their constant need to produce these "superfights". Everyone here keeps talking about the next superfight, but what they forget, is when one of these occurs, it prevents that fighters from defending their belt for approximately 8 months. Let the classes develop naturally and allow the fighter within those weight classes a timely chance at winning a championship.

 

2) Less PPV's - IMO there are too many PPV's. Don't get me wrong, I love watching the PPV's and I can never wait for the next one coming (ask my wife). I think with less PPV's, we will start seeing better cards in place, however. What to do with all the fighters out there? Fight Nights are a great idea, and it still promotes the UFC the way they are intending to promote it (mass viewing by mass audiences). Also, the UFC has a new TV deal in place for 2010.

First off the UFC does not have a TV deal in place for 2010 yet. They are working on one, but they have not announced anything yet. The issue they have is the UFC has bargaining control with the networks and the networks don't really like that too much. The UFC wants complete production control with the shows that they produce, companies like Strikeforce give that production control to the network... it shows. Don't worry a network deal will get done, unfortunately for you however, it will not decrease the number of ppv's per year just yet. What you will be looking at is an additional 4 cards per year on network tv. In order to constantly give you great cards, the UFC is always looking to sign new talent.

 

3) The judges - now this IS obvious, but nonetheless, is desperately needed. Dana knows it, the fans know it, the fighters know it, but unfortunetly the AC's are pulling an ego trip HAVING to control all fights happening in their respective states. This is fine, but to apply the same rules is rediculous. Wouldn't it be great to have retired fighters as judges???? Royce, Liddel, Randy...when they retire that is.

You will not see former fighters of legendary status like you listed as judges. They simply don't make money as a judge. An MMA judge makes about $1000-$1500 a night plus per diem... as a color commentator they can make a wee bit more than that ;)

 

Judges training is what has to be looked at and the ABC has started to look at that. At this years meeting they looked at training for judges and referees, but nothing has been set yet. That is one of the problems we have... with the ABC meeting only once or twice a year, things simply don't get done quick enough. They need to set up a criteria for meetings and reviews of judges and referees and look at training events multiple times a year.

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It's great to see your comments on this matter Brewster, so far I have nothing but respect for you knowledge of MMA and business. Concerning what you wrote, you are right about how the superfights are getting in the way of fighters defending their belt. This is a problem the UFC has to address (I can only assume they are), as the title of this thread alludes to. As for the PPV's, less PPV's are coming (I think you agreed on this), because of the immanent tv deal. This will only increase the viewership for the PPV because more people can afford and watch local cable, then PPV's. Thus, in turn creating better fight cards when PPV's are scheduled. As far as judges are concerned, I didn't mean to infer I want to see ex-fighters as judges (that's why I put so many ?????). I just through out a suggestion, and I am starting to get a feel on peoples opinions.

 

All in all, the UFC has been on a marketing rampage over the past 5-6years increasing viewers, fighters, earnings, and credibility. I think now is the time to refine it, and these are some ways I believe could improve their business, the sport, and viewer appeal.

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Unfortunately I think I mentioned that you will not be seeing a reduction in the number of PPV's per year... Dana has said this already in an interview earlier this year. You will continue to see 12 PPV's per year, but will see an additional 4 shows per year if a network deal can get done.

 

The most important aspect of this thread is the one you made in your first post... that this is still a very young business. Yes the way we view the UFC will change in the future, but of course that will take time. Advertisers like the UFC, but we don't have networks bidding BILLIONS of dollars for rights as of yet ;) Who knows, maybe the day will come and when it does maybe then some of you will be able to pipe down about what fighters make...

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The problem we have is not so much with the Champions themselves' date=' but with the UFC matchmaking and their constant need to produce these "superfights". Everyone here keeps talking about the next superfight, but what they forget, is when one of these occurs, it prevents that fighters from defending their belt for approximately 8 months. Let the classes develop naturally and allow the fighter within those weight classes a timely chance at winning a championship.

 

 

First off the UFC does not have a TV deal in place for 2010 yet. They are working on one, but they have not announced anything yet. The issue they have is the UFC has bargaining control with the networks and the networks don't really like that too much. The UFC wants complete production control with the shows that they produce, companies like Strikeforce give that production control to the network... it shows. Don't worry a network deal will get done, unfortunately for you however, it will not decrease the number of ppv's per year just yet. What you will be looking at is an additional 4 cards per year on network tv. In order to constantly give you great cards, the UFC is always looking to sign new talent.

 

 

You will not see former fighters of legendary status like you listed as judges. They simply don't make money as a judge. An MMA judge makes about $1000-$1500 a night plus per diem... as a color commentator they can make a wee bit more than that ;)

 

Judges training is what has to be looked at and the ABC has started to look at that. At this years meeting they looked at training for judges and referees, but nothing has been set yet. That is one of the problems we have... with the ABC meeting only once or twice a year, things simply don't get done quick enough. They need to set up a criteria for meetings and reviews of judges and referees and look at training events multiple times a year.[/quote']

 

I'm only gonna comment on judging, which I have the most experience with. I think if a ref has to learn the aspects of mma, then the judge should too. When I did mine here, judges and ref's did the exact same seminar to learn how it all works. Athletic commissions need to put it as a require to attend and pass a mma related seminar before they can judge. I know Big John McCarthy holds reffing seminars where there's only like a 27% passing rate. Something of the same lines should be done for judging

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Unfortunately I think I mentioned that you will not be seeing a reduction in the number of PPV's per year... Dana has said this already in an interview earlier this year. You will continue to see 12 PPV's per year' date=' but will see an additional 4 shows per year if a network deal can get done.

 

The most important aspect of this thread is the one you made in your first post... that this is still a very young business. Yes the way we view the UFC will change in the future, but of course that will take time. Advertisers like the UFC, but we don't have networks bidding BILLIONS of dollars for rights as of yet ;) Who knows, maybe the day will come and when it does maybe then some of you will be able to pipe down about what fighters make...[/quote']

 

I apologize for misinterpreting what you said - that happens far too much IMO on these threads. I can't wait to see where the UFC will go in the future, and I just wanted some feedback from fans on thier opinions about where they would like it to go. About people commenting on how much fighters make...well, my thoughts are expressed in different threads on this topic, but I am tired of hearing about it too.

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I'm only gonna comment on judging' date=' which I have the most experience with. I think if a ref has to learn the aspects of mma, then the judge should too. When I did mine here, judges and ref's did the exact same seminar to learn how it all works. Athletic commissions need to put it as a require to attend and pass a mma related seminar before they can judge. I know Big John McCarthy holds reffing seminars where there's only like a 27% passing rate. Something of the same lines should be done for judging[/quote']

 

agreed 100%, I also think they should be required to take that seminar and re-test yearly.

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I'm only gonna comment on judging' date=' which I have the most experience with. I think if a ref has to learn the aspects of mma, then the judge should too. When I did mine here, judges and ref's did the exact same seminar to learn how it all works. Athletic commissions need to put it as a require to attend and pass a mma related seminar before they can judge. I know Big John McCarthy holds reffing seminars where there's only like a 27% passing rate. Something of the same lines should be done for judging[/quote']

 

So why aren't the athletic commissions pushing for this then - ie: training the judges and refs more often and more thoroughly? What is their motive for not doing it?

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They are looking into it. The ABC doesn't move quickly however as I mentioned. The AC's don't like to admit they are wrong in the way they do things (they are a level of Gov't after all). But with pressure from fans and promoters, as we currently have, I believe things will evolve and we will see changes.

 

But unfortunately like all things, it's never fast enough.

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I'm only gonna comment on judging' date=' which I have the most experience with. I think if a ref has to learn the aspects of mma, then the judge should too. When I did mine here, judges and ref's did the exact same seminar to learn how it all works. Athletic commissions need to put it as a require to attend and pass a mma related seminar before they can judge. I know Big John McCarthy holds reffing seminars where there's only like a 27% passing rate. Something of the same lines should be done for judging[/quote']

 

I am a licensed official (time keeper) in the state of Kentucky and soon in Ohio, and the ONLY thing you have to do is fill out a piece of paper, pay your $25, and listen to a 3 minute pep-talk before the event. You can go to your state's boxing commision website (or athletic commision) and read the basic application for yourself. So then what happens is the state takes the "veteran" officials and assigns them to the larger events. i.e.- Greg Franklin, Rich's brother, is making his UFC referee debut in December after being a ref around here for about 5 years.

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you have some good points i agree on' date='

i think ufc should be having alot more free events to build there up and comers and give the lower down fights more of a chance and to fight.[/quote']

 

Exactly my point, glad you got it. I think it would benefit the 'young' fighters to fight on smaller cards (like free events and/or a possible tv deal) then putting them in the big shows. This will give fighters like Ross Pearson, James Wilks, Matt Brown, Amir Sadullah, George Sotiropoulos and even Paulo Thiago more exposure to a larger fan base, thus building their maturity and comfort level inside the octogon, capitalizing on their true skill level and potential.

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the superfights are getting in the way of fighters defending their belt. This is a problem the UFC has to address

 

I have to disagree. The suprfights are only on the table because of the weakness of the in division fighting. ON top of that there are a number of fighters outside of the UFC who would make credible ooponents (Feder,Cung Lee. Brown/Faber etc)

 

Penn/GSP/SIlva are unchallenged within their own divisions.

 

Machida and Lesnar?

 

In my opinion they are also basically without credible competition with their division .

 

Others may disagree.

 

You give Silva something in division worth fighting and the super fight talk will stop.

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Let me first say...

 

1) From what I see' date=' there is nothing in the contract stating that if you are champion you MUST defend your title at least every second fight. This still allows the fighter to explore other options (weight classes), but also keeps his obligation as champion into focus.

 

2) Less PPV's - IMO there are too many PPV's.

 

[/quote']

 

 

 

So you want less pay per views and fewer title fights?

 

Sounds like a genius business plan...I can only assume you'll be hearing Dana White personally immediately upon him reading this.

 

Where did I say fewer title fights? Read logically before responding please.

 

If fighters are not obligated to defend their titles as often and if they're we're fewer PPVs logic dictates that they're would be fewer title fights. Duh.

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I don't get it, the UFC has taken the sport from underground obscurity to legitimate mainstream respectability yet people still continue to second guess their every move. They gives us loads of great PPVs, excellent free cards and seem to be doing a great job taking the their org global which can only make for better MMA since it will be drawing from a worldwide talent pool. Where's the respect?

 

The only think I think really needs changing is the judging/scoring. If they can't go back to the drawing board and draft something better than the current 10 point must system then they need to have open scoring after each round. That way fighters and their corners would know when they were getting the shaft and they could at least swing for the fences and try to take it out of the hands of the judges. Some fans say that's BS and that fighters should always "give it 100% and go for the big decisive finish" but the reality is that when I fighter thinks he's won nearly every round of a title or high profile fight he's not going to risk blowing simply for a more impressive win.

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the superfights are getting in the way of fighters defending their belt. This is a problem the UFC has to address

 

I have to disagree. The suprfights are only on the table because of the weakness of the in division fighting. ON top of that there are a number of fighters outside of the UFC who would make credible ooponents (Feder' date='Cung Lee. Brown/Faber[/b'] etc)

 

Penn/GSP/SIlva are unchallenged within their own divisions.

 

Machida and Lesnar?

 

In my opinion they are also basically without credible competition with their division .

 

Others may disagree.

 

You give Silva something in division worth fighting and the super fight talk will stop.

 

Ok, for starters, Brown & Faber both fight at 145 lbs, a division that doesn't exist in the UFC, and they are both under WEC contracts, so I'm not sure where you were going with that.

 

Secondly, Cung Le is done fighting. He is going the way of Rampage and trying to become a big movie star. (not that he would have lasted 2 rounds with Anderson Silva anyway)

 

I won't bother touching on Fedor. That dead horse has been kicked enough. We'll just hope that he runs through everyone in Strikeforce and decides to make his way over.

 

But the place that you really lost me is Lesnar and Machida. Did you seriously just say that their is no one to challenge them in their weight classes? You sir, must be out of your mind. I suppose you just came out of a coma and missed UFC 104 all together. Machida is damn lucky to still have his belt and I doubt he'll have it this time next year. Either Shogun will repeat the beating he put on him and take it, or someone else will step up and take it, now that the Machida code has been cracked and everyone saw how to beat him.

 

And Lesnar? Seriously dude? He hasn't even defended the belt yet. Their is a laundry list of guys that could pose a serious threat to the big idiot. Let him get a couple of title defences under his belt before you start trying to build him up as some god lke monster that can't be defeated.

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And Lesnar? Seriously dude? He hasn't even defended the belt yet. Their is a laundry list of guys that could pose a serious threat to the big idiot. Let him get a couple of title defences under his belt before you start trying to build him up as some god lke monster that can't be defeated.

 

I couldn't agree more...as much as I try to ignore it I have to admit that a big part of the reason I loathe Lesnar so much is because of his fans who have proclaimed him to be some invincible super-human who fears no man. The guy has had 5 fights and some are already labeling him the favorite against Fedor...it's utter ridiculousness.

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The betting line on Lesnar/Carwin OPENED at Lesnar -180 Carwin +150, the spread only got bigger and was over 400 by the time it was cancelled.

 

This is another case wher anyone who honestly believes Carwin is going to win should be betting the farm on him. You are never going to get a better payday, because the people who do it for a living think Carwin has no shot whatsoever.

 

Sanchez fans are in that boat right now.

 

Instead of shooting their mouths off about him they ought to be putting every nickel they can beg borrow or steal on him because he is massive underdog in Vegas.

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The betting line on Lesnar/Carwin OPENED at Lesnar -180 Carwin +150' date=' the spread only got bigger and was over 400 by the time it was cancelled.

 

This is another case wher anyone who honestly believes Carwin is going to win should be betting the farm on him. You are never going to get a better payday, because the people who do it for a living think Carwin has no shot whatsoever.

 

Sanchez fans are in that boat right now.

 

Instead of shooting their mouths off about him they ought to be putting every nickel they can beg borrow or steal on him because he is massive underdog in Vegas.[/quote']

 

 

And what was the betting line prior to GSP/Serra the first time they fought? Just curios?

 

And Christ no, I'm not comparing Carwin to Serra...I'm just pointing out one of many examples of the bookies being dead wrong. MMA is a different animal than boxing, it's wildly unpredictable.

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Serra was an 800 point underdog.

 

It was the biggest upset in MMA betting history by a mile.

 

My point exactly...and here are some more historic UFC upsets proving that it's never safe to predict the outcome in MMA and that bookies and betting syndicates often don't have a clue and that what they predict about Lesnar/Carwin is pretty much meaningless.

 

10. Randy Couture vs. Vitor Belfort: UFC 15

At UFC 15' date=' relative newcomer Randy Couture was set to face Vitor Belfort in a match that many experts compared to the ancient practice of feeding Christians to the lions. Couture had only two fights under his belt while Belfort was 4-0 in the Octagon. Not only was he undefeated, Belfort had four straight (T)KO’s and never had a match go longer than two minutes.

 

Randy was supposed to be a cakewalk for the invincible Brazilian but it was Couture who earned the TKO stopping Belfort with strikes shortly after eight minutes. They would face off two more times in 2004 but the match that will be remembered in my book is probably their first as it ranks as one of the UFC’s first big upsets.

 

9. Jason Lambert vs. Renato Sobral: UFC 68

Renato Sobral was widely considered one of the top light-heavyweights in the world and for good reason. Since July of 2002 he compiled an impressive 12-2 record including a ten-fight winning streak.

 

Like Minotauro Nogueira, who could have been on top for years if not for a certain Russian cyborg, Babalu was second only to Chuck Liddell. His bout against Lambert at UFC 68 was supposed to be a chance to get back to his winning ways.

 

Lambert wasn’t having it. Talented but unproven, Lambert was coming off a KO loss to Rashad Evans and had a history of falling short against popular fighters like Tim Sylvia and Cabbage Correira. He was expected to follow suit against Sobral but instead stunned the world with a lights-out KO at 3:26 of the second round.

 

8. Frank Mir vs. Marcio Cruz: UFC 57

Believe it or not there was a time when Frank Mir was the poster boy for UFC heavyweights. He was an 8-1 submission master and a fan favorite long before breaking Tim Sylvia’s arm. After a devastating motorcycle accident kept him out of action for nearly two years, the UFC welcomed him back by matching him against Brazilian cream puff Marcio Cruz.

 

What was planned as a homecoming quickly turned into a nightmare as the 1-0 rookie put Mir on his back and started raining down elbows until a blood soaked Mir could no longer defend. The fight was mercifully stopped at the end of the first round and Frank’s career would never be the same.

 

7. Mark Coleman vs. Maurice Smith: UFC 14

Mark Coleman was one of the first true heavyweight goliaths of the UFC using his superior wrestling and ground ‘n pound to lay waste to the entire division. At 6-0 he had already destroyed legends Gary Goodridge and Dan Severn by submission and Don Frye by TKO.

 

His next victim was UFC newcomer Maurice Smith who was 3-4 with submission losses to Ken Shamrock and Bas Rutten. It looked like an early night for the heavily favored Coleman but instead it became a very long one as Maurice put an end to the era of dominant wresting and scored a unanimous decision after twenty-one minutes of fighting.

 

The Pete Williams head kick may be the loss that fans remember, but to me the Smith fight was a more shocking upset (and what I consider the beginning of the end). Coleman would never see another victory in the UFC and eventually defected to PRIDE in 1999.

 

6. Jens Pulver vs. Joe Lauzon: UFC 63

Jens Pulver — like most lightweights — was unwelcome in the Octagon after the UFC decided they were better off without a 155-pound division. Fortunately good sense prevailed and Jens, like the division, was reinstated.

 

Little Evil was undefeated in the Octagon and his win over BJ Penn was a memorable battle. Now he looked to return to greatness and his ring entrance at UFC 63 looked more fitting for a war hero or a matador than a UFC combatant.

 

In his first UFC match, unknown Joe Lauzon admitted to taking Jens antics personally. He took out his anger on an unsuspecting Pulver with a brutal KO in the first round. Any thoughts of Jens walking to the title went out with the lights.

 

5. Chuck Liddell vs. Randy Couture: UFC 43

Appearing for the second time in my illustrious list is “The Natural” and this time it’s for upending the mighty Liddell at UFC 43. Chuck was 12-1 and on a torrid ten-fight winning streak looking as close to immortal as a fighter can get.

 

In contrast Randy was coming down from heavyweight after getting crushed by Josh Barnett and Ricco Rodriguez. Nearly 40, Randy was seen as not just a huge underdog, but also an aging combatant in a sport that long since passed him by (if they only knew).

 

For the second time Randy made the critics eat their words as he put an absolute clinic on the bewildered Liddell stopping him with strikes in the third round.

 

4. BJ Penn vs. Matt Hughes: UFC 46

Matt Hughes was a victory machine. Coming into the Penn fight Matt was 13-0 since 2001 and a staggering 34-3 overall. He was making it look easy and scoffed at the idea of BJ moving up in weight. After all, Penn was a mere pup compared to the welterweight workhorse and Hughes probably took things lightly.

 

He shouldn’t have. BJ tooled him from start to finish and choked Hughes into tapping in the first round. The look on Matt’s face perfectly summarized what we were all feeling: complete and utter disbelief. He didn’t even notice when the Hawaiian celebrated with a kiss. He was too busy trying to figure out what just happened.

 

3. Randy Couture vs. Tim Sylvia: UFC 68

After reading this list I wonder how I could have ever picked against Randy. But pick against him I did, as did most, when he came out of retirement to face the hulking menace from Camp Miletich.

 

Randy’s last dance in the Octagon was grotesquely one-sided, and his return to a weight class that chewed him up and spit him out in 2002 seemed ill-advised and money-driven. Few believed Randy when he claimed to have found a hole in Sylvia’s game and we quietly hoped he would get through the fight void of serious injury.

 

Once again we looked on in astonishment as Randy dropped The Maine-iac in the opening seconds of round one and continued to punish him throughout the fight. Tim summed it up best after dropping the decision: “He would strike when I thought he would shoot and shoot when I thought he would strike.”

 

Tim shouldn’t feel bad for having Randy make him look stupid. He’s been doing it to us for years.

 

2. Mirko Cro Cop vs. Gabriel Gonzaga: UFC 70

I’ll admit it. Part of what makes this upset come in at #2 is the way it ended. Aside from Randy Couture (who looks more and more like a genius with every move he makes) I don’t think anyone gave Gonzaga a real chance at winning.

 

People may have been open to a decision loss or a freak submission but if you wanted to lay odds on a head kick they would have laughed in your face. Well no one is laughing now as the artist formerly known as #2 in the world is back in Croatia licking his wounds.

 

Gonzaga was a talented fighter before the bout but his TKO loss to Croat associate Fabricio Werdum made it hard to believe he could withstand the strikes of Cro Cop. Mirko later admitted to having blurry vision courtesy of Gonzaga elbows and never saw it coming. Don’t worry Mr. Filipovic, neither did we.

 

1. Matt Serra vs. Georges St. Pierre: UFC 69

As if there was any doubt, I present the greatest upset in the UFC and perhaps all of mixed martial arts. Nobody in the world whose last name isn’t Serra gave Matt a chance against an opponent largely considered one of the best fighters in the world today.[/quote']

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But one thing I am going to throw out there, the 10 point must system is pretty flawed too. That needs MAJOR fixing. The biggest thing I can think of is having "the attempts to finish a fight". This would definitely be more favourable to ground guys that attack submissions none stop but don't get the proper points for it. It would definitely take away from the lay n prayers

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If fighters are not obligated to defend their titles as often and if they're we're fewer PPVs logic dictates that they're would be fewer title fights. Duh.

 

First, the discussion on this thread is refreshing, but let me clear something up for you Nero. Less PPV's don't mean less title fights. How often is a title on the line now? Not every ppv. The amount of PPV's does not correlate to a fewer amount of title shots. What it does correlate to is better fights on the same card, thus having some lesser known fighters fight on other cards (Fight Nights, or the new TV deal the UFC is trying to nail down). This in turn, would increase viewership (possibly increase total number of cards the UFC puts on a year), increase the number of fighters the UFC can put on display, ensure a better chance of respectable fights on PPV's, and provide a better opportunity for the UFC to schedule new fights when fighters get hurt/ill. This is my opinion however, and not everyone will see it my way. I just thought some clarity was needed, as it is tough to come across right in this forum. That being said, more talent is needed to support this theory, so it may not be feasable right now. I do think IN THE FUTURE this will be an improvement.

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"My point exactly...and here are some more historic UFC upsets proving that it's never safe to predict the outcome in MMA and that bookies and betting syndicates often don't have a clue and that what they predict about Lesnar/Carwin is pretty much meaningless."

 

Thats fine.

 

Then just look at the fact that the line opened high (bookies) and got higher (betters).

 

There is no serious money on Carwin, otherwise the line would get smaller.

 

Chasing upsets is a tough way to make a living. And Carwin over Lesnar would be a BIG UPSET. That;s according to the bookies AND the betting public, who presumably know a little something about it.

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