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Fighters weights, before they cut


Triumph

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This whole thing can be very confusing for some people.

A fighter's "walking around" weight, contrary to some beliefs, is not what they weigh a few days before a fight that they cut in mostly water on the final day. When a fighter says I walk around at *** lbs they mean their average weight at the times when they are not training. A proper cut from walking weight takes several weeks of training and diet management and most fighters get within 8-10% of their target weight around a week pre fight, and the final cut is all water weight in the final 24 hours.

So when someone says Rumble Johnson cuts from 205 to 170, that cut is taking weeks to do and within a week of weigh ins his weight will be around 185 or so .

Same with Alvez, GSP, and many fighters in each class. Most MW's walk around at around 210-220, and are around 200 within a week of weigh in day.

 

The percentages vary but that is the standard formula.

Anyone says any fighter is cutting 30 lbs to weigh in, which equates to about 20% body weight, is mistaken. Maybe over their entire camp, but not within the last week. Except of course for Lesnar where 30 lbs fall into the 10% range.

 

You see some variation also depending on a fighters background and even nationality. American wrestlers mastered the weight cut long ago, so their percentage to cut in water can be a little higher due to experience. The Brazilians have just picked up these techniques in the past 10 years or so so theirs will be lower. Asians in general cut way less weight in water over the final days so they are usually just naturally smaller dudes to begin with, Akiyama, Chonnen, and many others who fight at MW actually walk around at just above 185 and could make the cut to 170 pretty easily with the right team but most choose not to due to the belief it drains too much from a fighter close to fight time..

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Efrain Escudero weighed in at 155 the other night and within an hour once he had received his IV drip he weighed 172 so he'd probably put on even a bit more on top of that.

 

And look where that got him, gassed out after a round and submitted. Like I was saying once you cross that 10% line if you aren't careful it does more harm than good.

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This whole thing can be very confusing for some people.

A fighter's "walking around" weight' date=' contrary to some beliefs, is not what they weigh a few days before a fight that they cut in mostly water on the final day. When a fighter says I walk around at *** lbs they mean their average weight at the times when they are not training. A proper cut from walking weight takes several weeks of training and diet management and most fighters get within 8-10% of their target weight around a week pre fight, and the final cut is all water weight in the final 24 hours.

So when someone says Rumble Johnson cuts from 205 to 170, that cut is taking weeks to do and within a week of weigh ins his weight will be around 185 or so .

Same with Alvez, GSP, and many fighters in each class. Most MW's walk around at around 210-220, and are around 200 within a week of weigh in day.

 

The percentages vary but that is the standard formula.

Anyone says any fighter is cutting 30 lbs to weigh in, which equates to about 20% body weight, is mistaken. Maybe over their entire camp, but not within the last week. Except of course for Lesnar where 30 lbs fall into the 10% range.

 

You see some variation also depending on a fighters background and even nationality. American wrestlers mastered the weight cut long ago, so their percentage to cut in water can be a little higher due to experience. The Brazilians have just picked up these techniques in the past 10 years or so so theirs will be lower. Asians in general cut way less weight in water over the final days so they are usually just naturally smaller dudes to begin with, Akiyama, Chonnen, and many others who fight at MW actually walk around at just above 185 and could make the cut to 170 pretty easily with the right team but most choose not to due to the belief it drains too much from a fighter close to fight time..[/quote']

 

Thank you for explaining, because yes it can be very confusing to those who just started watching like myself. Whenever I've heard them mention walking around weight no one said anything about it being what they weighed when they weren't training. Now this makes much more sense. :)

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Personally I think they should weigh in the DAY of the fight. None of this who can dehydrate themselves the most. But hey' date=' thats just me.[/quote']

 

Gotta say I agree with this. I'm fairly new to MMA. . but why hasn't this been done already? It's obviously been thought of before. There's probably a good explanation.

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Gotta say I agree with this. I'm fairly new to MMA. . but why hasn't this been done already? It's obviously been thought of before. There's probably a good explanation.

 

Weigh ins the day before comes from boxing and wrestling, mostly from tradition, and the athletic commissions which first forced the split into weight classes in order to get sanctioning set it up that way.

 

In boxing the tradition began in the late 1800's so the fighters weights could be published in the papers before the fight and give the gamblers a chance to make and take their wagers.

 

In wrestling it becamee more of a necessity because of the number of fighters in the official tournaments were so large the weigh in process took all day since by rule all fighters must weigh in on the same scale. At one time weight classes were assigned after weigh ins according to the number of fighters in a certain range. American wrestlers developed the weight cut in order to take advantage of the rules as they were set and in essence pick their own weight class.

 

Since then it is primarily done out of tradition and for the gambler's sakes.

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Weigh ins the day before comes from boxing and wrestling' date=' mostly from tradition, and the athletic commissions which first forced the split into weight classes in order to get sanctioning set it up that way.

 

In boxing the tradition began in the late 1800's so the fighters weights could be published in the papers before the fight and give the gamblers a chance to make and take their wagers.

 

In wrestling it becamee more of a necessity because of the number of fighters in the official tournaments were so large the weigh in process took all day since by rule all fighters must weigh in on the same scale. At one time weight classes were assigned after weigh ins according to the number of fighters in a certain range. American wrestlers developed the weight cut in order to take advantage of the rules as they were set and in essence pick their own weight class.

 

Since then it is primarily done out of tradition and for the gambler's sakes.[/quote']

 

Also it gives them a whole day to find someone else to fight (or cancel) if a fighter doesn't make weight.

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This whole thing can be very confusing for some people.

A fighter's "walking around" weight' date=' contrary to some beliefs, is not what they weigh a few days before a fight that they cut in mostly water on the final day. When a fighter says I walk around at *** lbs they mean their average weight at the times when they are not training. A proper cut from walking weight takes several weeks of training and diet management and most fighters get within 8-10% of their target weight around a week pre fight, and the final cut is all water weight in the final 24 hours.

So when someone says Rumble Johnson cuts from 205 to 170, that cut is taking weeks to do and within a week of weigh ins his weight will be around 185 or so .

Same with Alvez, GSP, and many fighters in each class. Most MW's walk around at around 210-220, and are around 200 within a week of weigh in day.

 

The percentages vary but that is the standard formula.

Anyone says any fighter is cutting 30 lbs to weigh in, which equates to about 20% body weight, is mistaken. Maybe over their entire camp, but not within the last week. Except of course for Lesnar where 30 lbs fall into the 10% range.

 

You see some variation also depending on a fighters background and even nationality. American wrestlers mastered the weight cut long ago, so their percentage to cut in water can be a little higher due to experience. The Brazilians have just picked up these techniques in the past 10 years or so so theirs will be lower. Asians in general cut way less weight in water over the final days so they are usually just naturally smaller dudes to begin with, Akiyama, Chonnen, and many others who fight at MW actually walk around at just above 185 and could make the cut to 170 pretty easily with the right team but most choose not to due to the belief it drains too much from a fighter close to fight time..[/quote']

 

Very well said.

 

Oh, and some of your guys are exaggerating the weights of these fighters alot. Case in point:

 

Anthony "Rumble" Johnson, said that he got up to 220lbs. due to a leg injury, and getting fat as he called it, as he wasn't able to train. He usually walks around at 200lbs. Same as Thiago Alves. Alves does not weigh 210lbs. Heck, he stated that he weighed around 195 before cutting weight to fight GSP. 210lbs. is just ludicrous.

 

Brock Lesnar stated that he weighs 285lbs., before he starts to transition to cut the weight. When he is not on his fight schedule he stated that he weighs 300lbs. He should weigh that much, cause that dude listed what he eats throughout the day, and it would kill most people to eat that much red meat.

 

The only fighter I know of that is notorious for cutting the most weight is Gleison Tibau, who literally made Joe Stevenson look skinny. Gleison is said to weigh 183lbs. the day of the fight. That's insane for a lightweight.

 

The fighters that have it down to a science (Meaning that they don't gas out from losing too much water weight), are Franklin and Tito Ortiz.

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Personally I think they should weigh in the DAY of the fight. None of this who can dehydrate themselves the most. But hey' date=' thats just me.[/quote']

 

i agree with this- weigh ins like 3-4 hours before the fight. taking the weight cut out of the game would make the fights closer and more exciting- no fighters getting gassed after the 1st round cause they didnt re-hydrate themselves properly, no fighters having a major advantage in size over thier opponents. the weight classes are supposed to make the fighters evenly matched size wise, weight cutting completly side steps that ,and factors a LOT into the fights. at least they would be the same size , or at least close to it and the fighters SKILL would determine the outcome, not the skills and weight cutting routine like it currently is now. just ask hendo why he lost to silva- weight cut didnt go well and he gassed after the first round. up to that point hendo was whooopin silva's ****.

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to the people saying there should be something done about the weight cut, i completely agree, weight classes are there for a reason, i view it as almost cheating, when some of these people cut a lot of weight, i understand that you pretty much have to cut weight in order to not be completely disadvantaged, but the ufc or who ever else is in charge of this stuff should have done something long ago to counter the people trying to cut a lot of weight, because it starts a trend and now unless you are insanely skilled you have to cut weight. there needs to be restrictions in my opinion. ultimate weight cut championships...

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Let me get this straight, so thiago alves accually is at 200 pounds when hes fighting in the actual fight? and gleison tibau is at 183 when hes fighting? thats almost two weight classes up isnt it? This seems unfair to me to have such a big weight advantage. Some people talk about the heavyweight being unfair cuz one fighter is 240 and the other is 265, but isnt that the same thing?

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Let me get this straight' date=' so thiago alves accually is at 200 pounds when hes fighting in the actual fight? and gleison tibau is at 183 when hes fighting? thats almost two weight classes up isnt it? This seems unfair to me to have such a big weight advantage. Some people talk about the heavyweight being unfair cuz one fighter is 240 and the other is 265, but isnt that the same thing?[/quote']

 

No, no, and no. Nobody is cutting 30 lbs in water weight 24 hrs before a fight, except Brock or other superheavyweights.

30 lbs on a LW and WW fighter is around 20% body weight in water. That is coma time from dehydration and brain damage.

Alves may show up at camp at 200 lbs, but his weight cut takes weeks of training and diet discipline, same with Thibau. On fight night Alves might rehydrate up to around 185 or so, and Thibau is around 165-170 on fight night. The rest of that "weight cut" came weeks before from training.

On fight night the biggest weight advantage you'll see is probably 5 lbs in the lower weights. The real advantage comes from when a fighter normally walks around 20-30 lbs over fighting weight their body adapts by gaining the strength needed to carry that much weight. That's why when Joe Riggs first dropped from a 230 lb HW to a WW he was knocking dudes out left and right, but really skilled fighters would beat him regularly.

This is why wrestlers almost always carry the strength advantage since they have mastered the weight cut. This is what makes wrestling sometimes appear to be the most dominant style but BJ has shown that with all things physically equal a good striker/BJJ fighter can easily beat and even dominate a supposed dominant wrestler.

 

And whether anyone thinks it is "fair" or not is irrelevant. It is part of the fight game and well within the rules. If someone is physically able to work within the rules and use it to their advantage, then so be it. I don't think it is right that a wrestler can win by simply repeating takedowns and making no effort to finish and do no damage, but it is within the rules and if they can use the rules to their advantage, so be it!

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