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TKD black belt?


blackknight

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So Herschel Walker is making his mma debut and from what I understand he's tae kwon do black belt. How relevant do you guys really think tkd is in mma? I mean I think Walker is too old period to be just starting a mma career.

 

Time will tell

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TKD - simple, fast kicks without sacrificing position or stance GREAT

side kick, front kick, round house, spinning back kick

 

 

flashing flying double butterfly hapkido flipkick - nope

 

 

 

 

 

could someone land a jumping spinning back heel cresent kick? yeah, buts its more liekly that he's going to be put on his ****.

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I think the discipline and movement you learn in any martial art is beneficial. So TKD does provide help in some area...as mentioned...it's really a very simple art....I'd say the best thing you learn and use frequently in TKD is a variety of kicks. But...no...if all you have is a background in TKD...you aren't ready for an MMA contest...you'd need to get a good boxing or muay thai coach to help you with your head movement and hand strikes. You'd need to learn some rudimentary wrestling at the least. AND you'd need to learn some rudimentary JJ.

 

So yeah...TKD is a base to work from like any...but it wouldn't be my first choice if I was building the perfect fighter..but there are also some pluses to having it in your repertoire.

 

Cheers

 

-DR

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I think the discipline and movement you learn in any martial art is beneficial. So TKD does provide help in some area...as mentioned...it's really a very simple art....I'd say the best thing you learn and use frequently in TKD is a variety of kicks. But...no...if all you have is a background in TKD...you aren't ready for an MMA contest...you'd need to get a good boxing or muay thai coach to help you with your head movement and hand strikes. You'd need to learn some rudimentary wrestling at the least. AND you'd need to learn some rudimentary JJ.

 

So yeah...TKD is a base to work from like any...but it wouldn't be my first choice if I was building the perfect fighter..but there are also some pluses to having it in your repertoire.

 

Cheers

 

-DR

 

^^agreed^^ nuff said really

 

not to take away from TKD, but in any Sparring Tournament I've been in, not once have I lost to a TKD fighter. there kicks can easily be seen.

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I think the discipline and movement you learn in any martial art is beneficial. So TKD does provide help in some area...as mentioned...it's really a very simple art....I'd say the best thing you learn and use frequently in TKD is a variety of kicks. But...no...if all you have is a background in TKD...you aren't ready for an MMA contest...you'd need to get a good boxing or muay thai coach to help you with your head movement and hand strikes. You'd need to learn some rudimentary wrestling at the least. AND you'd need to learn some rudimentary JJ.

 

So yeah...TKD is a base to work from like any...but it wouldn't be my first choice if I was building the perfect fighter..but there are also some pluses to having it in your repertoire.

 

Cheers

 

-DR

 

dont wish to offend anybody but TKD has nothing to offer to an MMA fighter.

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dont wish to offend anybody but TKD has nothing to offer to an MMA fighter.

 

I wouldn't say "nothing" because I think it really depends on the individual, and how he or she applies what he or she has learned.

 

One person may be lethally adept at a head kick or spinning back kick.

 

Another may simply not have the speed and flexibility to pull it off.

 

Doesn't mean the kicks are worthless. But it may be that for the majority it is not viable.

 

You could have one fighter who incorporates a few aspects from TKD that competes in MMA and is fantastic.

 

And you could have another who has nothing from TKD that is equally as skilled.

 

I'd say it's far more about how a particular discipline is applied by an individual. Rather than the discipline itself.

 

Cheers

 

-DR

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if the tkd practioner goes in the ring and tries to olympic style spar. no. but there is alot of stuff that you learn in tkd that translates well and gives you an advantage when you start to learn other styles of striking, especially muay thai. you better believe that if a skilled tkd guy sees you square your stance off your getting drilled with a side kick or a back kick.

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dont wish to offend anybody but TKD has nothing to offer to an MMA fighter.

 

Tell that to Anderson Silva' date=' Dan Hardy, Ross Pierson and Cung Le..[/quote']

 

yeah coz they use TKD in the the cage all the time right?

 

Yes, TKD does have some excellent kicking techniques that can be used in MMA. Like any other martial art, it does not offer a complete base for an MMA fighter, but it certainly develops some good kicking skills that can be used in competition. Freedom, to say TKD has "nothing" to offer an MMA fighter is just a crazy display of bias.

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The basic flaws of TKD are:

1. That it is a points based technique without the emphasis of follow-through power.

 

2. The contact point of a TKD kick is the top of the foot instead of the ankle or shin. The top of the foot is not solid enough to transfer power effectively.

 

Muay Thai is a much better kicking base for MMA.

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The basic flaws of TKD are:

1. That it is a points based technique without the emphasis of follow-through power.

 

2. The contact point of a TKD kick is the top of the foot instead of the ankle or shin. The top of the foot is not solid enough to transfer power effectively.

 

Muay Thai is a much better kicking base for MMA.

 

1. That is not the scoring system employed in all TKD matches. Full-contact TKD allows knockouts and puts an emphasis on power, and is a much more effective fighting style than point-fighting.

 

2. You are only considering roundhouse kicks in that statement. One of the most effective kicking techniques for MMA that is used in TKD is the spinning back kick, which uses the bottom of the heel to strike.

 

I agree that in general Muay Thai is a better striking system to have as a base in MMA, but that is no reason to discount TKD or other striking arts. I believe the best fighters will use techniques from many different styles to give themselves an edge.

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problem is im sure walker got his belt from one of them shopping center TKD classes.. i doubt he has been training at a quality gym for 30 years like he claims

 

He's a 6th or 7th degre which, given that he would have had to have some contact with either the ITF or WTF, gives his credentials some aspect of validity.

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1. That is not the scoring system employed in all TKD matches. Full-contact TKD allows knockouts and puts an emphasis on power' date=' and is a much more effective fighting style than point-fighting.

 

2. You are only considering roundhouse kicks in that statement. One of the most effective kicking techniques for MMA that is used in TKD is the spinning back kick, which uses the bottom of the heel to strike.

 

I agree that in general Muay Thai is a better striking system to have as a base in MMA, but that is no reason to discount TKD or other striking arts. I believe the best fighters will use techniques from many different styles to give themselves an edge.[/quote']

 

Tis true there are full contact matches but in general the technique is based on speed and max distance, not power. However, there is a kick I forgot about which is a beautiful balance of both. I forget the name of it, but it is a lead leg kick that starts out by stepping your rear foot up behind your lead foot, then launching your lead foot as you rotate your hips in, driving your heel straight into your opponent. Lots of power and speed and hard to avoid.

 

Probably not used much in MMA as it is difficult to be pinpoint accurate, and even good strikes to the midsection are not valued that much. Also leaves you vulnerable to a foot grab/ takedown.

 

GSP and A. Silva use it with frequency, though.

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The basic flaws of TKD are:

1. That it is a points based technique without the emphasis of follow-through power.

 

2. The contact point of a TKD kick is the top of the foot instead of the ankle or shin. The top of the foot is not solid enough to transfer power effectively.

 

Muay Thai is a much better kicking base for MMA.

 

 

TKD, or any competitive martial art, isn't a point based technique. Competing in point competitions is however. So its not really the Martial art, but rather, the style of competition, that makes it a point system. So to say that TKD is soley and purposefully only for a point based competition is really not true. While training will vary from place to place, any good and applicable place will not only use point sparring, but continous.

 

Point sparring is great for a few things, but only doing point sparring will get you in bad habits for some things.

 

Form - Balance - Speed - Power.

 

I don't train in TKD, but there are many who have, do. To say that they don't teach how to hit with power is just not true.

 

What I think has given TKD a bad rap, like any McDojo, is promoting too quickly, way to many belts, too much demonstrations and emphasis on looks. This is of course a stereotype, and I am sure there are some stellar TKD schools out there.

 

with any fighting system, you need execute what will work, when it will work.

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1. That is not the scoring system employed in all TKD matches. Full-contact TKD allows knockouts and puts an emphasis on power' date=' and is a much more effective fighting style than point-fighting.

 

2. You are only considering roundhouse kicks in that statement. One of the most effective kicking techniques for MMA that is used in TKD is the spinning back kick, which uses the bottom of the heel to strike.

 

I agree that in general Muay Thai is a better striking system to have as a base in MMA, but that is no reason to discount TKD or other striking arts. I believe the best fighters will use techniques from many different styles to give themselves an edge.[/quote']

 

+1

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