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Weaknesses of Submissions


MABFanForLife

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Whenever someone gets caught in a submission, you can always see them struggling to break free first, usually on brute strength alone before finally either admitting defeat or letting a limb get broken or passing out.

 

Yet I look at some submissions and I can see very obvious ways to get out of them. Granted, I don't know how plausible it would be, since I have no one to test my theories on. Therefore, I post this in the hopes that either someone can confirm what I see to be weaknesses in various submissions, or that they can point out to me why it wouldn't work.

 

Rear-Naked Choke: We'll start with easily the most obvious one. Unless you have biceps bigger than Lesnar's, I highly doubt it's possible to submit a man with only one arm. The key to securing this choke is grabbing your supporting bicep with the choking arm, then pulling the support arm back in order to create the pressure needed to get the choke. Which means that the weakness of this choke is that supporting arm. If the opponent can't bring it back towards his head, the choke has little pressure. So, logically, the best thing to do would be to simply reach up and pull that arm forward. And because your opponent's arms are tied up trying to get the choke, he can't defend against that. He either has to outmuscle you in keeping that arm secure, or he has to let go of the choke.

 

Triangle: When I first saw the Triangle Choke, I thought it was the coolest thing ever. And even to this day, it remains my favorite submission technique. However, after looking at it more closely, the Triangle Choke does have a very obvious flaw. Much like the Rear-Naked Choke, the Triangle Choke cannot work unless both legs are in a set position. The Over-The-Shoulder Leg must lock into the space behind the Supporting Leg's knee. Which is the flaw. When being submitted by the Triangle, one of your arms is trapped. But the arm you need is conviently located right next to the area where the legs lock. Which means that all a person would need to do in order to escape a Triangle is grab the Over-The-Shoulder Foot and pull it out from behind the Supporting Leg's knee. This would instantly remove the pressure and the lock would be useless.

 

Armbar: This is the one I'm most unsure about. Again, these are all theories based on observation, since I have no one I can try these on. This one does seem like it requires a decent amount of strength to pull off. When going for the Armbar, one must usually throw their legs onto their opponent's body in order to help create the leverage needed for it. The flaw that I see in it is the legs. Because the legs also act to render you unable to move inside your opponent's guard and thus negate it. So what seems like the best thing to do would be to reach out with your free arm and shift one of your opponent's legs aside in order to scramble back into your opponent's guard. Now, would one's arm have enough strength to move his opponent's leg, can't say. But I do believe this has merit.

 

Muay Thai Clinch: I know this isn't a submission, but this is just something I wanted to throw out there real quick. You watch and you listen to men like Rich Franklin and Rampage Jackson about their experiences in the Muay Thai Clinch against men like Anderson and Wanderlei Silva. And when you watch them, they generally always try to muscle their way out. Which seems stupid. The Muay Thai Clinch is designed to help land devastating knees. In order to help do this, a short stance is used in order to throw knees more quickly. To me, this screams Double-Leg Takedown. The Muay Thai Clinch uses a much shorter stance and brings one's opponent within arm's reach. Rather than try to muscle their way out of it, the best thing would seem to be going for a takedown. In such a position, it would not only put you back on the offensive and get out of the clinch, but could work towards helping you recover from any knees you might have otherwise suffered.

 

Again, these are all theories. To those who are better trained the art of BJJ, I ask them if they would be willing to take what I've said into consideration and either confirm what I've laid out or tell me why these tips wouldn't work.

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Take some classes and be put in these moves, I think you may have a better appreciation and a realistic understanding about timing and effectiviness. Some submissions are easier to get locked in once the opponent is tired and beat up a bit. After struggling and exerting tons of energy, its harder then you think to get out of a good sub when done right. There are ways to try to get out of course, its like a chess match.

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These are great questions and I'd be happy to answer them. I do no-gi BJJ only and so I know exactly what positions you are talking about.

 

RNC - This is definitely an escape for this choke but it only works if your opponent is using poor technique. If you are using proper technique your supporting arm is almost touching the back of the neck and its impossible to reach.

 

Triangle - If you take a look at someone in a triangle choke neither arm can reach the foot or knee in order to break the lock. There's simply no way your arm can bend like that.

 

Armbar - This may work for some people but it's a very novice and puts you in a bad position. Also very hard to pull off because the legs are quite a lot stronger than arms, just not a practical escape.

 

Clinch - Unless you have been in a Thai Clinch before you wouldn't believe how controlling it is... very hard to escape against a guy like Anderson Silva. Shooting for a takedown from there is very hard to do because it's easy to anticipate and you are a little closer to your opponent than you normally would be when shooting for a leg. The last reason this isn't done more is because when someone is clinching and controlling you, they only have 1 weapon to use, knees, so the reaction time is a lot quicker and you are likely to be kneed in the ribs, stomach or face.

 

Hope I answered your questions.

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RNC - the target arm should be the one attempting to slide under your chin.

 

the RNC defense is chin low. turn your head to the side so your chin and shoulder become one. use two hands on the one arm under your neck. secure wrist control and pull the wrist down to your hips. use the secured arm to turn into the opponent's guard.

theres no way in hell reaching up behind your head and trying to straighten the locking arm is going to work. its called powerzones. hes working chest level, in close, your working behind and above your own head.

 

Triangle - your defense is retarded. how many people could out power a leg by reaching behind their shoulder. are you talking about people, or like hydrolic cyborgs? The triangle defense is - head up when passing or opponent controlling a shoulder. stack the opponent up elevating their hips adds to your posture and the weight of their body is against them. get your arm back in by exerting pressure with the forearm on the inner thigh. keep the opponent infront of you, they will ge the most power about 90 degrees off to the side. keeping them infront, stacked and using both hands you can slam your opponent. put your weight down on the locking leg and explode up to bust open their legs.

 

Armbar - don't keep your arms straight and keep them on the opponent's chest, not on the mat or behind the neck. keep your opponents hips under your, they need to turn to the side to lock up the armbar. if your opponent tries to lock it up, jerk your arm back so atleast your elbow is free, and keep your head down on the chest of the opponent. they need to get the leg around the head to finish. stack the opponent up. stacking makes it harder to spring out to finish and can allow you to get your elbow out. spin into the arm so its running down your body instead of 90 degrees out to the side, this way you can use your legs to pull your arm out.

 

MT Clinch - Lotsa different ways a double leg TD could help but you are diving towards the knees you are trying to avoid. A better way is to stay erect, stand tall. keep your hips in close to his. weave in your own clinch or go for a body lock. from a body lock a leg trip or hip throw take down is available. Rich Franklin should have just taken a knee, that way he couldn't have been devastated by the clinch.

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RNC - the target arm should be the one attempting to slide under your chin.

 

the RNC defense is chin low. turn your head to the side so your chin and shoulder become one. use two hands on the one arm under your neck. secure wrist control and pull the wrist down to your hips. use the secured arm to turn into the opponent's guard.

theres no way in hell reaching up behind your head and trying to straighten the locking arm is going to work. its called powerzones. hes working chest level' date=' in close, your working behind and above your own head.

 

Triangle - your defense is retarded. how many people could out power a leg by reaching behind their shoulder. are you talking about people, or like hydrolic cyborgs? The triangle defense is - head up when passing or opponent controlling a shoulder. stack the opponent up elevating their hips adds to your posture and the weight of their body is against them. get your arm back in by exerting pressure with the forearm on the inner thigh. keep the opponent infront of you, they will ge the most power about 90 degrees off to the side. keeping them infront, stacked and using both hands you can slam your opponent. put your weight down on the locking leg and explode up to bust open their legs.

 

Armbar - don't keep your arms straight and keep them on the opponent's chest, not on the mat or behind the neck. keep your opponents hips under your, they need to turn to the side to lock up the armbar. if your opponent tries to lock it up, jerk your arm back so atleast your elbow is free, and keep your head down on the chest of the opponent. they need to get the leg around the head to finish. stack the opponent up. stacking makes it harder to spring out to finish and can allow you to get your elbow out. spin into the arm so its running down your body instead of 90 degrees out to the side, this way you can use your legs to pull your arm out.

 

MT Clinch - Lotsa different ways a double leg TD could help but you are diving towards the knees you are trying to avoid. A better way is to stay erect, stand tall. keep your hips in close to his. weave in your own clinch or go for a body lock. from a body lock a leg trip or hip throw take down is available. Rich Franklin should have just taken a knee, that way he couldn't have been devastated by the clinch.[/quote']

 

This!!

 

Another good armbar escape is to turn your thumb and arm away from the 12'oclock finishing position and more toward the 9 oclock position (away from the face of the person applying the armbar), while walking your legs toward the open area between the legs of the guy applying the armbar and spinning your body. This relieves the pressure on the arm and allows you to yank your arm free. The timing has to be right or you'll miss it and have to tap. Its very much an all or nothing escape but works very well if done correctly

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