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Excellent article on MMA in the UK


Ares9139

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http://www.fiveknuckles.com/mma-news/Despite-progress' date='-British-MMA-still-battling-misconceptions-of-the-sport.html

 

Found this on Five Knuckles and agreed with it so much, it rings very true to what I've experienced with people who don't know much about MMA in the UK. If your interested, I encourage you to read it.

 

Thoughts?[/quote']

 

Most parts true and some wrong, I know for a fact that lots of people that I know and hang around with absolutely love MMA, not because I talk about it so much but because they have freinds (besides myself) who train in MMA and lots of events which aren't too popular and well-known but still MMA events nonetheless are actually held where I live. I think that its good because I know a couple of people who actually bought tickets just to go see what the big fuss about MMA was all about and they have all been hooked ever since so I would recommend going to see some local events to anyone who's a borderline fan.Most people I know have just happened to tune in by accident to an episode of TUF and been fans ever since, and it's not just the "lads lads" that are into it, over here MMA and the UFC is on it's way to becoming mainstream for sure!

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Most parts true and some wrong' date=' I know for a fact that lots of people that I know and hang around with absolutely love MMA, not because I talk about it so much but because they have freinds (besides myself) who train in MMA and lots of events which aren't too popular and well-known but still MMA events nonetheless are actually held where I live. I think that its good because I know a couple of people who actually bought tickets just to go see what the big fuss about MMA was all about and they have all been hooked ever since so I would recommend going to see some local events to anyone who's a borderline fan.Most people I know have just happened to tune in by accident to an episode of TUF and been fans ever since, and it's not just the "lads lads" that are into it, over here MMA and the UFC is on it's way to becoming mainstream for sure![/quote']

 

I'm going to have to disagree, most people I know have never heard of the UFC, let alone MMA, just vaguely know it as "cage fighting". It's getting bigger over here, most definitely, but at the moment it's still restricted by people's preconceptions of it being an unsactioned bloodbath. Maybe it's just different where you live because it sounds like it's quite prominent there, but where I'm at literally no-one knows what it is.

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I'm going to have to disagree' date=' most people I know have never heard of the UFC, let alone MMA, just vaguely know it as "cage fighting". It's getting bigger over here, most definitely, but at the moment it's still restricted by people's preconceptions of it being an unsactioned bloodbath. Maybe it's just different where you live because it sounds like it's quite prominent there, but where I'm at literally no-one knows what it is.[/quote']

 

I know with the older generations this is the case, but I'm personally almost 18 years old and all the people around me and the scene around here with MMA is really big, especially where I live because there are quite a lot of events held in this town (Even though they are all small promotions.) MMA does seem to be the cool thing among the youth down by where I am, must be different where you are...

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Yeah, I'm still quite young too and from the South-East, I think it's just had limited exposure over here, although that's starting to change, I've introduced a lot of friends to it and they're getting into it but most still haven't really heard of it. Hopefully in a few years when people know it as MMA, not Cage Fighting, it can really take off.

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It's those damn stuck-up closed minded adults I say! My mums one of them, she comes in the room when me and my dad were watching a TUF episode a very long time ago where Edwin Dewees got his head busted open and the blood was pouring out, like seriously i've never seen so much blood in a MMA fight prior. And she just goes mental, "What the **** you watching this for you neanderthals!?" and just walks out in a huff, quite funny.

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It's those damn stuck-up closed minded adults I say! My mums one of them' date=' she comes in the room when me and my dad were watching a TUF episode a very long time ago where Edwin Dewees got his head busted open and the blood was pouring out, like seriously i've never seen so much blood in a MMA fight prior. And she just goes mental, "What the **** you watching this for you neanderthals!?" and just walks out in a huff, quite funny.[/quote']

 

i remember that fight it was on season 4

that was a blood bath but tis not like every fight is like that but people see stuff like that and think thats what MMA is all about :(

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I completely agree with everything in the article. If you ask me, it all comes down to the medias insistance on referring to the sport as 'Cage Fighting', which presents an image of something brutal and uncontrolled.

 

I said it at the time, but I'll say it again. A few months ago there was a rumour that Ricky Hatton was considering a transition to MMA, and that Randy Couture had offered to coach him in grappling. I still honestly believe that this would be the best possible thing to happen to British MMA. It would be a perfect way to introduce huge numbers of new people to the sport. Guys like Michael Bisping, Dan Hardy and Paul Daley are all doing their part, but whilst they give existing British fans someone to cheer for, they're not exactly bringing in new fans.

 

I went to Canada last summer with some friends, and I couldn't believe how mainstream MMA was. Everyone knew who GSP was and the vast majority of the people I met liked to follow his progress. Now, I know that none of the British fighters have reached the same level of success as GSP (or even close), but I can guarantee that not even 1 in 100 people on the street are gonna have a clue who Dan Hardy is, or who Michael Bisping is.

 

The sport is unfairly portrayed in the UK without doubt. The lack of following isn't a result of the country being uninterested in the sport - it comes as a result of people misunderstanding the sport. If you were offered the chance to stay up late at night to watch two untrained brawlers punch each other until one of them was knocked out, would it really interest you? The sad truth is, that's how most people in the UK see MMA.

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I'm going to have to disagree' date=' most people I know have never heard of the UFC, let alone MMA, just vaguely know it as "cage fighting". It's getting bigger over here, most definitely, but at the moment it's still restricted by people's preconceptions of it being an unsactioned bloodbath. Maybe it's just different where you live because it sounds like it's quite prominent there, but where I'm at literally no-one knows what it is.[/quote']

 

+1

I've met guys that refer to themselves as cage fighters and it really annoys me as well as guys who claim to love it but call it cage fighting, i also got told a few motnhs ago wanderlei silva had never been beaten and had always been in the ufc.

Uneducated people eh

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Now everyone in this country likes football, (or soccer as you will undoubtedly know it) your choice of team is like a birthmark and I couldn't go doing that along with everyone else. No I needed something different, or even better, something controversial.

 

Evidently, after that statement, he is not a real man. You can't be British and not like football. Unless you're a loser. So I can't really take his opinion seriously.

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I understand the point of the thread, but personally i like UK MMA as it is. It's more personal, im the only 1 that i know (before i started training MMA) that actually knows enough about the sport to understand that its not mindless. I was at the even in Manchester in Nov. and the UK MMA scene seems 2 b filled with people who love this sport and are not casual fans which i think wud change if it was to become big in the UK.

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I completely agree with everything in the article. If you ask me' date=' it all comes down to the medias insistance on referring to the sport as 'Cage Fighting', which presents an image of something brutal and uncontrolled.

 

I said it at the time, but I'll say it again. A few months ago there was a rumour that Ricky Hatton was considering a transition to MMA, and that Randy Couture had offered to coach him in grappling. I still honestly believe that this would be the best possible thing to happen to British MMA. It would be a perfect way to introduce huge numbers of new people to the sport. Guys like Michael Bisping, Dan Hardy and Paul Daley are all doing their part, but whilst they give existing British fans someone to cheer for, they're not exactly bringing in new fans.

 

I went to Canada last summer with some friends, and I couldn't believe how mainstream MMA was. Everyone knew who GSP was and the vast majority of the people I met liked to follow his progress. Now, I know that none of the British fighters have reached the same level of success as GSP (or even close), but I can guarantee that not even 1 in 100 people on the street are gonna have a clue who Dan Hardy is, or who Michael Bisping is.

 

The sport is unfairly portrayed in the UK without doubt. The lack of following isn't a result of the country being uninterested in the sport - it comes as a result of people misunderstanding the sport. If you were offered the chance to stay up late at night to watch two untrained brawlers punch each other until one of them was knocked out, would it really interest you? The sad truth is, that's how most people in the UK see MMA.[/quote']

 

Exactly, the media have no interest in promoting something which has such barbaric connotations, it was just epitomised for me when I heard it being flippantly discussed on Big Fat Quiz of The Year on Channel 4 a few weeks ago, Charlie Brooker said something along the lines of "it doesn't matter, they don't have any rules and can do what they want anyway" - it's this kind of image that people have of the sport. Mixed martial arts has such different connotations to cage fighting, it's unbelievable, but describing it as "cage fighting" implies it is no holds barred, unsanctioned and between two untrained thugs. Until tabloids start labelling it differently, its growth will be limited over here.

 

I agree about Hatton, it would've certainly brought the media attention to the sport, but unfortunately it didn't happen and now our main ambassador in the tabloids is Alex Reid and even then he's still described as a "cage fighter".

 

I think because the sport is so promotion-based (UFC, Strikeforce, Dream etc.) it makes it harder to think of as an actual sport for some people. Boxing has promotions which are far more low-key, the fighters are the more important part; people will refer to a boxing event coming up at the weekend, whereas with MMA it will be referred to as the Strikeforce event or UFC event etc. I think this hinders it from becoming a mainstream sport to an extent as well.

 

I just want people to understand that it's not a barbaric, unskillful freak show and actually top level athletes competiting in carefully sanctioned bouts, safer than boxing even. Here's to hoping.....

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With Ross Pearson being from Sunderland(where im from) it's finally starting to get a little more recognition as a legit sport, then again Ross can walk through the city center and maybe 1-2 people would recognise him while on the other hand Tony Jeffries(olympic boxing bronze medlist) will walk through and get mobbed..

 

I have noticed a lot of gyms in Sunderland now advertise MMA training which will also help long term, but i still believe we have a long long way to go yet. It doesnt help that fking Alex Reid doesnt correct people when they say he is a Cage Fighter, he imo does more bad than good to the sport tbfh..

 

Just gotta keep promoting it correctly and eventually ppl will be more educated and see it for the high skilled SPORT it is.

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I know with the older generations this is the case' date=' but I'm personally almost 18 years old and all the people around me and the scene around here with MMA is really big, especially where I live because there are quite a lot of events held in this town (Even though they are all small promotions.) MMA does seem to be the cool thing among the youth down by where I am, must be different where you are...[/quote']

 

I agree with this, that article does relate to the older generation but no so much the younger, you wont hear many males under 30 saying they dont watch it because its to bloody or brutal, the main reason they dont watch is because of the ground game, not many people understand it, all they see is two people hugging on the floor which to them looks a bit gay. Saying that though the sport is definately growing, I have definately noticed a rise in people watching it where I live, UFC 105 helped with alot of English fighters winning and alot of good stand up fights.

The key to getting the UFC on more mainstream channels may be convincing them its not a bloodsport, this is because the people who run the TV channels are of the older generation im guessing.

The key to getting more fans in the UK is to educate them about the ground game.

Where I live its known as UFC more than it is Cage Fighting, not many people know it as MMA though.

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