Jump to content

Amir Khan knocks out Zab Judah


Psycho_MMA

Recommended Posts

in the 5th round with a body shot

 

Zab argues that it was a low blow but looking at it a few times its not a low blow , perfectally legal and he was proably a bit buthurt after the loss.

 

Gratz to amir Khan he know sets his sights on facing the winner of Floyd Mayweather vs Victor Ortiz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

fair enough ;) reckon he'll have a chance against Floyd??

 

I think Khan would have success early against Mayweather, then as he figures out Amir's timing, he would take the later rounds with counters.

 

Khan's speed will cause a problem, i think he could take some rounds and make it pretty close if he follows a good gameplan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Khan would have success early against Mayweather' date=' then as he figures out Amir's timing, he would take the later rounds with counters.

 

Khan's speed will cause a problem, i think he could take some rounds and make it pretty close if he follows a good gameplan.[/quote']

 

Yeah I agree it could be a competitive fight, Khan could pull it off

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The shot looked like a low blow to me. Amir was definitely the better fighter throughout the fight but Amir held the back of Judah's neck and pulled him down as he delivered the low blow to his belt area. Definitely a sketchy way to win the fight. I'm sure he would have won anyway but another disappointing, sketchy end to a boxing match. I keep trying to watch boxing to get into it but everytime I watch it it just makes me appreciate MMA more and boxing less.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boxing is so lame

 

Boxing is a lot tougher then MMA! Some boxers get knocked out 3 or more times in one fight, Boxing can be brutal at times. How many MMA fighters have been killed in the ring? Also, championship boxing matches are 36 minutes. MMA is only 25 minutes. I am a huge fan of both, but boxing still rules!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The shot looked like a low blow to me. Amir was definitely the better fighter throughout the fight but Amir held the back of Judah's neck and pulled him down as he delivered the low blow to his belt area. Definitely a sketchy way to win the fight. I'm sure he would have won anyway but another disappointing' date=' sketchy end to a boxing match. I keep trying to watch boxing to get into it but everytime I watch it it just makes me appreciate MMA more and boxing less.[/quote']

Unless his ******* is growing out of his stomach there was no way in hell that was a low blow

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boxing is a lot tougher then MMA! Some boxers get knocked out 3 or more times in one fight' date=' Boxing can be brutal at times.[/b'] How many MMA fighters have been killed in the ring? Also, championship boxing matches are 36 minutes. MMA is only 25 minutes. I am a huge fan of both, but boxing still rules!!!

 

That is why you have guys like Ali who can barely walk or talk. Adrenaline will wake them up and keep them fighting so they can take more damage. There are very few high profile brutal boxers left. Pacman still puts a hurting on guys but other than that Klitschko and Mayweather are boring to watch. The only two boxers that I can actually enjoy watching right now are Pacman and Yuriorkis Gamboa.

 

MMA>Boxing for the last 8 years

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is why you have guys like Ali who can barely walk or talk.

 

Contrary to popular belief, Muhammad Ali's Parkinson's Syndrome is unrelated to his time in the ring. He does not exhibit the symptoms of the battered "punch drunk" fighter. But in fact, his old rival Joe Frazier does exhibit those classic symptoms. Parkinson's only gives the illusion of it.

 

Ali's troubles affect only his body. His mind is intact.

 

Notice that actor Michael J. Fox, who also has Parkinson's disease, had his symptoms come upon him while at the same age Ali was when his symptoms started. Fox's troubles are also confined to his body.

 

Muhammad Ali was one of the best defensive fighters of his era, and possibly of all time. He was hit in the head less than any other prolific fighter from his era, yet he's the only one diagnosed with Parkinson's Syndrome. His contracting of the disease is clearly unrelated to his profession.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Contrary to popular belief' date=' Muhammad Ali's Parkinson's Syndrome is unrelated to his time in the ring. He does not exhibit the symptoms of the battered "punch drunk" fighter. But in fact, his old rival Joe Frazier does exhibit those classic symptoms. Parkinson's only gives the illusion of it.

 

Ali's troubles affect only his body. His mind is intact.

 

Notice that actor Michael J. Fox, who also has Parkinson's disease, had his symptoms come upon him while at the same age Ali was when his symptoms started. Fox's troubles are also confined to his body.

 

Muhammad Ali was one of the best defensive fighters of his era, and possibly of all time. He was hit in the head less than any other prolific fighter from his era, yet he's the only one diagnosed with Parkinson's Syndrome. His contracting of the disease is clearly unrelated to his profession.[/quote']

 

I know that Ali would have had Parkinson's either way but many experts agreed that boxing accelerated the condition and overall made it worse. Either way Being knocked out multiple times in a fight is terrible for your body.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know that Ali would have had Parkinson's either way but many experts agreed that boxing accelerated the condition and overall made it worse.

 

I would have to call BS on that. The way Michael flops around like a fish when he walks' date=' I would think he has the worst of it, and he never got hit in the head (except when Biff kept popping him). There is no cure for Parkinson's even now, and it is still a great mystery where it comes from, and I think the "experts" (whatever that means when there is no cure and it is still a mystery) were just grasping at something that seemed easy to put in their reports.

 

Either way Being knocked out multiple times in a fight is terrible for your body.

 

I 100% agree.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have to call BS on that. The way Michael flops around like a fish when he walks' date=' I would think he has the worst of it, and he never got hit in the head (except when Biff kept popping him). There is no cure for Parkinson's even now, and it is still a great mystery where it comes from, and I think the "experts" (whatever that means when there is no cure and it is still a mystery) were just grasping at something that seemed easy to put in their reports.

 

LOL that's sweet. Did you happen to see Michael J Fox on Rescue Me a year or two ago? He was pretty good on there and kind of funny.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have to call BS on that. The way Michael flops around like a fish when he walks' date=' I would think he has the worst of it, and he never got hit in the head (except when Biff kept popping him). There is no cure for Parkinson's even now, and it is still a great mystery where it comes from, and I think the "experts" (whatever that means when there is no cure and it is still a mystery) were just grasping at something that seemed easy to put in their reports.

 

 

 

I 100% agree.

 

Freddy Roach also has Parkinson's, and he admits that head trauma accelerates the onset of the symptoms. Muhammad Ali is in such bad shape because he became a human punching bag at the end of his career.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Freddy Roach also has Parkinson's' date=' and he admits that head trauma accelerates the onset of the symptoms.[/quote']

 

How would he know if it did or not?

 

Muhammad Ali is in such bad shape because he became a human punching bag at the end of his career.

 

Ali is in such bad shape because he has Parkinson's disease. Rid**** Bowe on the other hand is in such bad shape because he became a human punching bag during his career.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How would he know if it did or not?

 

 

 

Ali is in such bad shape because he has Parkinson's disease. Rid**** Bowe on the other hand is in such bad shape because he became a human punching bag during his career.

 

I was a huge Ali fan in the day, but it made me sick to see him turn into a punching bag. His fans don't want to admit that. It's irronic that he used to insult fighters who weren't well spoken, and he turned out to be worse off then any of them. It's pitiful to see him in public shaking uncontrollably and drooling all over himself. You don't have to admit that it is because it is from head trauma, but it is.He was already showing signs in 1978, but his huge ego, and his yes-men's encouragement kept him fighting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was a huge Ali fan in the day' date=' but it made me sick to see him turn into a punching bag. His fans don't want to admit that.[/quote']

 

I'll admit that I liked seeing him perform the way he did in the Cleveland Williams fight over the way he did in the Ron Lyle fight, but even though he didn't move the way he used to, he still had really good defense. Certainly better than Bowe or Frazier even.

 

It's irronic that he used to insult fighters who weren't well spoken' date=' and he turned out to be worse off then any of them.[/quote']

 

He himself considers his condition a "punishment from Allah" for his previous sins.

 

It's pitiful to see him in public shaking uncontrollably and drooling all over himself. You don't have to admit that it is because it is from head trauma' date=' but it is.He was already showing signs in 1978, but his huge ego, and his yes-men's encouragement kept him fighting.[/quote']

 

Bowe isn't coherent enough to have any kind of opinion, while Frazier slips in and out of coherence throughout the day. Ali is mentally consistently sharp as he always was, and jokes around as much as he always has.

 

It's pretty clear that Parkinson's Syndrome has nothing to do with getting punched in the head. The classic "punch drunk" trauma is all about mental function, while Parkinson's is all about body function.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll admit that I liked seeing him perform the way he did in the Cleveland Williams fight over the way he did in the Ron Lyle fight' date=' but even though he didn't move the way he used to, he still had really good defense. Certainly better than Bowe or Frazier even.

 

 

 

He himself considers his condition a "punishment from Allah" for his previous sins.

 

 

 

Bowe isn't coherent enough to have any kind of opinion, while Frazier's slips in and out of coherence throughout the day. Ali is mentally consistently sharp as he always was.

 

It's pretty clear that Parkinson's Syndrome has nothing to do with getting punched in the head. The classic "punch drunk" trauma is all about mental function, while Parkinson's is all about body function.[/quote']

I still think he suffers from both, he was already suffering from slurred speech way back in 1980. If you ever heard him interviewed in 1967 and then 1980, there was a huge difference. I don't know if you remember the fight doctor, Ferdie Pacheco, who was Ali's physician when he fought, but Pacheco also said that head trauma accelerated the symptoms of Parkinson's. He would still have had Parkinson's, but not at this accelerated level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still think he suffers from both' date=' he was already suffering from slurred speech way back in 1980. If you ever heard him interviewed in 1967 and then 1980, there was a huge difference. I don't know if you remember the fight doctor, Ferdie Pacheco, who was Ali's physician when he fought, but Pacheco also said that head trauma accelerated the symptoms of Parkinson's. He would still have had Parkinson's, but not at this accelerated level.[/quote']

 

In 1980 Ali turned 40 years old. His symptoms first began at the age of 31, the same age Michael J. Fox was when his symptoms began.

 

It's been a number of years now that the Ali camp made the diagnosis public, and the idea that the famous pugilist must've been traumatized from the fight game has had decades to marinate in the popular consciousness by medical personnel and the fans alike. That does not make it true.

 

The truth of the matter is that Parkinson's Syndrome is still very much a mystery in every respect, and no one can definitely claim what caused it or what made it worse or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In 1980 Ali turned 40 years old. His symptoms first began at the age of 31' date=' the same age Michael J. Fox was when his symptoms began.

 

It's been a number of years now that the Ali camp made the diagnosis public, and the idea that the famous pugilist must've been traumatized from the fight game has had decades to marinate in the popular consciousness by medical personnel and the fans alike. That does not make it true.

 

The truth of the matter is that Parkinson's Syndrome is still very much a mystery in every respect, and no one can definitely claim what caused it or what made it worse or not.[/quote']

 

I've read your posts on several subjects, and I respect your opinions. I think you are way off the mark to say "that does not make it true" to the notion that Ali suffered the same brain trauma as any other fighter did. Ever since he came back in 1970 from his ban from boxing, he changed his style from one of not being hit to one of standing against the ropes and letting his opponents punch themselves out. He took severe beatings from Joe Frazier in 2 of their 3 fights. He also took beatings from George Foreman and Larry Holmes. Even when he won, he took major beatings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've read your posts on several subjects' date=' and I respect your opinions. I think you are way off the mark to say "that does not make it true" to the notion that Ali suffered the same brain trauma as any other fighter did. Ever since he came back in 1970 from his ban from boxing, he changed his style from one of not being hit to one of standing against the ropes and letting his opponents punch themselves out. He took severe beatings from Joe Frazier in 2 of their 3 fights. He also took beatings from George Foreman and Larry Holmes. Even when he won, he took major beatings.[/quote']

 

Let me back up a bit...

 

It's not my argument that Ali never received any damage from his fights, only that his Parkinson's Syndrome is unrelated to his chosen profession. I don't believe anyone has any grounds to say that the disease came from his boxing, or that it was enhanced or came on sooner through his boxing. You are right about the beatings he'd taken in his later years, and I would expect him to have SOME punch drunk symptoms. But those symptoms would be existing only alongside of his Parkinson's Syndrome and not a part of that package. The so-called "experts" are too eager and far too quick to link the two, and I think that is absolutely ridiculous.

 

It goes like this: Muhammad Ali is a man with Parkinson's Syndrome who also very well may have some punch drunk symptoms from his life as a boxer, but the one has absolutely nothing to do with the other. This is my official and definitive stance on the topic.

 

Now with all of that being said, it's a pleasure to talk to a fellow boxing fan. I still think Ali had really good defense in his post-court/layoff years (obviously not counting the Holmes and Berbick fights). I challenge you to count the total number of solid shots to the head he actually received from Foreman during the Rumble in the Jungle match. Despite the myth, he didn't simply allow George to punch himself out, but spent most of the fight tying him up, leaning on him, etc. and basically doing everything he could to tire the younger man out as soon as possible. I actually think he took significantly less punishment in that fight than in all of his tougest bouts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...